About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Management Based on Trust

Blog Pop Quiz:  How do your kids handle a substitute?

a) They’re wonderful with a substitute and my students eagerly share their news of excellent behavior with me when I return.  This action is then rewarded through some measure or behavior system (e.g. marble jar, stickers, points toward a PJ party).

b) My class is great for me, but they are horrible with a substitute. I dread the note on return and usually have to deduct points of some sort for their actions.

c) My class is rowdy with me and even rowdier with a substitute. I’d rather come in sick!

d) Things run as usual. The substitute leaves a note that the class was very helpful and the room is clean. There are a few notes from your kids wishing you well (if you were sick), and the usual routines are completed (e.g. tomorrow’s date on the board, pencils sharpened, vacuuming, etc.) There are no “rewards” given to the students when you return, just a gracious and authentic “I can always count on you” during your morning meeting together.

Let’s see what your answer may reveal!

Continue reading "Management Based on Trust" »

Guided Reading in the Upper Grade Classroom: Getting Started

Guided_reading_talk

Whether you use a reading workshop approach or not, guided reading is a component of literacy that many K-5 teachers use in their classroom. I want our sessions to have a comfortable feeling where students can ask questions, try new strategies, and work together to become more strategic readers. Setting up this environment takes some work and planning, which is why our class didn't begin meeting until the fourth week of school. I'd like to share some of the fundamentals of getting guided reading off the ground at the beginning of the year. 

Continue reading "Guided Reading in the Upper Grade Classroom: Getting Started" »

Recent Posts

Categories

Quick Links:

Recommended Sites:

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in Inside Angela's 4th Grade Classroom are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.