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myON reader: Librarian Carl Harvey; AASL President-Elect

Myonreader CapstoneDigital_CarlHarvey Reviewer:  Carl Harvey

Position: Librarian

District/School: North Elementary School, Noblesville, Indiana

Number of Students in School: 475

Product: myON reader from Capstone Digital


Goals:

First, we wanted to provide students with access to more eBooks. Second, we wanted a way to motivate them to read. Third, myON reader allows students to find materials at their grade level, which is great for school—and then to read anything they want, which is great for home. 

Response:

The response has been very positive. I have teachers using it a lot in their classrooms. We have students who are taking initiative to use it at home as well as coming to the library during recess to read myON books. I've had parents comment about their children logging on from home.

Reviewer’s Notes:

myON reader is fairly new (coming out in January 2011), so we are just beginning to see the impact it can have on our school. Students and teachers are very excited about it, and I think it will have the potential to be a part of our reading program.

Learning Curve:

We found it very easy to use. Each teacher received training after school for about an hour, and then during their Professional Learning Communities for an additional 45 minutes. We reviewed how to use it, how it could be customize for their classes—then them loose. I did an introduction with each class in the library to ensure everyone was ready to go. Capstone Digital got our names imported and set-up, so it has been a very easy thing to implement.

 How We Use It:

 We use it during guided reading time in our school. It is an activity that students can usually complete during that time. We want that time to be used to focus on reading their own books at their own levels, so myOn reader is a perfect connection for that. Beyond that, we encourage students to read on their own, so they use it at home, and during recess at school.

There are a lot of data reports and tracking options within myON reader. My teachers are just now beginning to explore all those options, but I think they could have impact on instruction in our school.

What’s Ahead?:

We're focusing in on how we could use myON reader to support summer reading. We'll be kicking it off with a myON day in the library, giving students and teachers some additional training and ideas for using myON reader. Next we'll encourage students to read, read, read. To encourage that, we’ll have a contest, where the class that reads the most minutes will get a prize. We'll also do a Family Literacy Night, and give myON reader a demo to everyone in attendance; with stations attendees can rotate through. 

More about the reviewer:

Carl A. Harvey is the school librarian at North Elementary School in Noblesville, Indiana. Carl is active in the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), serving currently as President-Elect. He has written three books -- The Library Media Specialist in the Writing Process (co-authored with Marge Cox and Susan Page) (2007), No School Library Left Behind: Leadership, School Improvement, and the Media Specialist (2008), and The 21st Century Elementary Library Media Program (2010) published by Linworth Publishing. Harvey’s awards include: Outstanding Media Specialist (2007), and the Peggy L. Pfeiffer Service Award (2007) from AIME. 

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How do you pay for this? Is this part of your regular budget or do you ask parents to pay for access?

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