Classroom Solutions > 114 posts categorized "Personal Reflection"

The Challenge Based Classroom: Using Curriculum to Serve the Community

HabitatLast year I came to a crossroads in my teaching. During my annual review, I found myself agonizing over my goals for this upcoming school year. I was completely stuck. I browsed through our district's professional development opportunities with a sense of “been there, done that.” It surprised me that so early in my career I would feel this way. My classroom certainly kept me on my toes, but I was missing that spark that ignited my planning each year. An offer to explore curriculum development made me even more confused. Was I really ready to leave the classroom? I needed a teaching makeover!

As if on cue, two amazing things happened that would transform my teaching: the opportunity to be a teacher advisor here and the discovery of Apple’s Challenge Based Learning. The journey outside of my comfort zone had begun.  

 

Read More »

My Reflections on the Education Nation Teacher Town Hall

Town Hall PhotoEvery year just before our December vacation, my school’s entire faculty takes a celebratory “field trip” to Rockefeller Center. We skate around the iconic rink and then feast at a nearby restaurant. Over dinner, we discuss our successes and challenges from the first semester and our goals for the second semester. I always leave with a deep appreciation for my creative, dedicated colleagues and a renewed enthusiasm for our profession. 

This past Sunday, I visited the Rockefeller Center skating rink for another gathering of passionate educators, this time foregoing ice skates and a winter coat. Instead, I joined several hundred teachers in a tent for NBC’s Teacher Town Hall, the kickoff event for their weeklong Education Nation initiative. So many interesting ideas were explored during the two-hour freewheeling conversation, and I left just as inspired as I am after my school's December outing. Read on for my thoughts on just a few of the ideas we covered.

Read More »

Five Tips for Creating the Problem-Free Group Project

Group1Assigning group work can be very frustrating. Reflecting back on my first year, I'm amazed at how out-of-control and unorganized my group projects were. I'm sure when the principal walked by my room, my class looked very chaotic. My students didn't understand my directions, the target was not clear, my expectations were off, and I wasn't sure how to grade them. But I took good notes on what worked and what didn't, and I did better the next year.

Though issues will arise with group projects, I continue to do them because the benefits are so great. Group work provides another form of assessment and takes students to a higher level of thinking. Students also learn to work on a team, an ability they will need in today's world. I've learned so much about myself and my students since I began group work. In this post, I'll share some of these things, along with five tips for creating a problem-free group project.

Read More »

Comments: 2

Extra, Extra, Read All About It! Current Events in the Classroom

Reading News on the SubwayOne of my personal goals this year is to read the newspaper every single day, regardless of how many student essays I need to read or how crazy my morning commute. I want to be aware of the world around me, and I am committed to living a more news-literate life. I bought a newspaper subscription for my Kindle, and at the very least, I am going to read the news while I take the subway to and from school.

While working on myself, I also consider my students’ current events literacy. I want to help my students to become informed young citizens and lifelong news readers. However, finding time for current events during our jam-packed school day has always posed a challenge. In this post, I'll share some of the solutions I've found. However, my current events curriculum is very much a work in progress, so I would love to hear how you cover world events in your classroom. 

Photo: One of my students reading a newspaper on the subway during a field trip. I need to learn from her!

Read More »

Comments: 2

Tips on Creating a Kindergarten Classroom Blog

Blogaholic Designs”=This year I'm creating a classroom blog for the first time. Needless to say, I simply love it! I have truly become a blogaholic. Creating a blog for your classroom will unlock the doors to a new world of communication. Read on as I introduce you to this virtual learning community and guide you through the steps for creating your own classroom blog.

 

Read More »

Comments: 4

Organizing my Classroom Library: The Never-Ending Story

Library OverviewAs I set up my classroom this year, I was so proud of myself. I had carefully organized when I packed up my room in June, so my room looked “livable” in just a few hours this fall. “Wow, this is smooth sailing,” I thought smugly. Then I approached my classroom library, and I didn’t emerge until 8:30 p.m.! 

The hours disappeared as I labeled book baskets, leveled new books, culled through my collection, and planned new library routines. This was certainly time well spent, but I have to tell you, sometimes my “librarian hat” feels heavier than my “teacher hat.” That said, I feel that much of my success as a reading teacher can be attributed to my classroom library. Join me on a photo tour of my classroom library, as I reflect on my organization systems and what works for me.


Read More »

Comments: 6

Creating a Positive Classroom Climate: "Capturing Kids' Hearts"

"If you have a child's heart, you have his head" - Flip Flippen

DSC00338 On the day I was hired at Randolph Jr/Sr High School as a special education teacher, the principal, Bill Caldwell, informed me that part of my professional development for the year would be to attend a three-day training titled "Capturing Kids' Hearts." The name alone had me hooked, and to hear him speak so passionately made me extremely eager to find out more about it. However, he didn't divulge any more information, other than to bring a personal item that held meaning for me and a lot of Kleenex. Little did I know that the magnitude of those three days would continue on in my teaching years later.

 

Read More »

Comments: 4

Developing Hopes and Dreams

Cloud

The goal of every teacher is to help students reach their fullest potential. Teaching students to develop their hopes and dreams for the new school year is a key skill for achievement. It helps them make the connection between their personal choices and the end results. Read on for ideas on how to encourage this important skill.

 

Read More »

Building the Foundation for a Successful School Year

Classgroup Week Two of the 2011-2012 school year is already "in the books."  I cannot believe how time is flying by so quickly. My students are beginning to transition from summer to school. They are adapting to my teaching style and I'm doing my best to get to know and understand their learning styles. My mind is beginning to focus on ways to make this a successful school year for myself, my students, and my school. The three S's (Self/Students/School) are a work in progress for me. Each year, I strive to improve in these three areas, realizing it will be difficult to achieve perfection. Having a positive mindset and maintaining a balance in these areas will build the foundation for a successful school year.

 

Read More »

Comments: 4

Avoiding Teacher Burnout: Celebrate You This Labor Day!

HelpTeachers, do you ever wish you could give yourself a time-out? Dealing with the different personalities and demands of our students, parents, administration, and that never-ending trail of paperwork can cause a teacher to feel overwhelmed and in need of a break. Although the school year has just started, it is always a great idea to learn different ways to prevent teacher burnout before it happens.

  

  

 

Read More »

Comments: 6

Tips for Creating Strong Teacher-Parent Relationships

 

 FcEffective communication is essential to create strong teacher-parent relationships and parental involvement. Students need the support of both teachers and parents in order to succeed academically, physically, and emotionally. Read on as I provide you with a few tips to help establish a strong relationship with your most powerful ally: parents.

Read More »

Comments: 6

Planning for the First Day of Kindergarten

Welcome to school
 
The first day of kindergarten can be both exciting and frightening for students, parents, and the teacher too. There are mixed emotions everywhere as this day marks a huge milestone in the child's life. As teachers, we need to incorporate ideas to help ease first day jitters and start the school year off on the right track. Here are a few tips to help you plan for the first day of kindergarten.

Read More »

Comments: 9

My Classroom Management Must-Haves, Part 2: Float Jars and More

Float Jar1Last week, I wrote about the color chart that I use to help my students manage their individual behavior choices. The color chart is my saving grace, but it is not the panacea for all behavior woes. This week, I am going to share some more of my favorite management strategies: The Float Jar, Table Stars, and my Homework Black Book.

Read More »

Comments: 8

Three Tech Tools to Collect and Analyze Student Interest Data

ToolsOur classroom and teaching strategies must be student focused. Maintaining a positive teacher and student relationship is very important.  According to Jim Burke in his book The Teacher's Essential Guide Series: Classroom Management, "the student-teacher relationship is the cornerstone of an engaging, successful classroom."  To build relationships with my students, I first need to know them. Talking with them in the hallways and at lunch is a start, but I need to know what they enjoy and what their strengths and weaknesses are in the classroom. Using "icebreaker" activities gives me some perspective on their personality, but doesn't tell me if a student enjoys reading or knows how to use various technologies. I have used paper and pencil surveys, but it is very time consuming to collect and analyze the data. However, I have found three time saving tech tools to collect and analyze student interest data.

 

Read More »

Comments: 2

Creating a Professional Learning Community This Fall

DSC00001 The motto of my school district, Randolph Central, is "Learning with passion, innovation, and leadership." This serves as an excellent foundation for my teaching, as well as a reminder of how crucial it is to inspire students with our instruction. A professional learning community (PLC) is a wonderful way to focus on student learning and assess teaching practices. And in these tough economic times, in-house professional development opportunities, like PLCs, are even more attractive. Read on to learn more about creating your own professional learning community.

Read More »

Comments: 12

Surviving the First Six Weeks of School, Part 1: Classroom Setup

Scholastic picThose restful days of summer have come and gone. It's almost time to enter a new school year. As you walk back inside your school, you can immediately feel your temperature rising. You are about to come face to face with the unknown. No, it is not some bloodcurdling creature out of a horror film. It's your classroom! Finding your once-organized classroom replaced by bare walls and empty shelves can be a bit frightening. Before you begin moving things from place to place, scratching up those freshly buffed floors, read on for strategies to help you with classroom setup.

Read More »

Comments: 24

My Top Five Tips on How to Celebrate Summer in Style

VacationLike most teachers, I am relishing every moment of summer, but before we know it the days of grading papers and creating dynamic lesson plans will be upon us. Therefore, let's live each day of the next few weeks to the fullest so we can return to our classrooms refreshed and ready to go. Here are my top five ways to celebrate summer. You can use these tips to make the most of your time off and rejuvenate yourself and your teaching as well!

Read More »

Comments: 3

Surviving the Back-to-School Transition

Blog1resize2Wow! This summer is flying by. The new school year is weeks away. The transition back to school is difficult whether we’ve been off for a couple months or just a few weeks. This year will be my fifth year going through the back to school transition as a teacher. Late nights and sleeping in will soon turn into late nights and getting up early to teach. The evenings spent by the pool or in front of the TV watching movies will turn into evenings preparing for lessons or grading. I know my students will struggle with the transition, too, so it is important that I am ready for the first day.

This transition doesn’t get any easier, but here are four things you can do to survive the transition back to school.

Read More »

Comments: 4

Director's Edit: Final Thoughts on the Year

Vasicek BrainThis is my farewell post. Before getting to the content, I'd like to thank Scholastic for allowing me the opportunity to share the magic that occurs behind the scenes in a classroom. I'd like to thank Special Days Camp, the students of Studio 24, and the Integrity Bros. for the continued inspiration and ideas. I'd like to thank any teacher, friend, student, family member, colleague, reader, or human that ever sparked an idea in my mind. From John Medina to Spencer Kagan, and from the author of The Hunger Games series to the inventor of spray paint, I thank you for your contribution to my classroom. Lastly, I'd like to thank you, my faithful readers. Your overwhelmingly positive comments, emails, and suggestions have made me a better teacher.

Although I could write at length about the value of all of the ideas that follow, the time is short. So the CliffsNotes version appears below. Here are a last few gems, for seasoned teachers or rookies, on which you can meditate this summer.

Read More »

Comments: 1

Memorial Day, One More "High School Uncut," and Farewell!

225505_10150630603755327_599375326_18743702_4923027_nMy father, Sam Petriello, is a World War II veteran and a Marine corporal who fought in the last battle of Okinawa. He also served as a sergeant in the 2nd Infantry Division in the U.S. Army. Sam participated in the first landing in Japan and the surrender of Japanese forces in North China. At the age of 85, my father is the president-elect of the 6th Marine Division Association, and he still meets with his Marine Corps buddies the second Tuesday of every month. My father lost his brother, Louis, in the war, as well as many friends and comrades, so Memorial Day was always a special day when we were growing up. My father instilled in his children and grandchildren the love of God and country, and he taught us the values of loyalty and hard work. My final post is dedicated to him.

Photo: My father at a Fourth of July parade.

Read More »

Comments: 9

To Endings, Transitions, and New Beginnings

Kindergarten End of the Year Summer FunIt’s the end of the school year, and to kick off summer vacation, our classroom became the O.K. (Over Kindergarten) Ranch and Corral. To prepare my students for the long break, I created a calendar of summer bridge activities to give to parents. And to get ready for next year, I got some great advice from some surprise stars.

Read More »

Comments: 2

Final Thoughts

NJang052611_iStock_000011161816BoyThanksI can't believe that this year has literally flown by and that I am posting my last blog post here. I want to share some of my personal reflections about blogging for Scholastic and how it has changed me as a teacher. I also want to thank everyone for all of their support!

Read More »

Comments: 8

One Look Back — Two Steps Forward

F81935817Where did the year go? It seems as though I was staring at a sea of unfamiliar faces just yesterday. In a few weeks, I'll be sending them on to 7th grade. Before sending them off, I take a few moments to have them reflect on the year. What was their favorite unit? What was the most important thing they learned? How could I make their learning experiences better? Then I collaborate with colleagues for about an hour, comparing notes, celebrating our successes, and discussing areas to target.

As hectic as these last few weeks are, it is important to take time to reflect on the year and create personal and professional goals while everything is fresh in your mind.   

Photo credit: iStockphoto/Tommydickson.

Read More »

Comments: 62

End-of-the-Year Reflections

DSC00135As the school year draws to a close, I begin reflecting back on everything that's happened. What were the challenges this year? What could I have done differently? Join me as I answer these questions and more. You can also watch a cute video of a few of my students reflecting on their 2nd grade year.

 

 

 

 

Read More »

Comments: 4

Planning for the End of the Year

DSC00606Mother's Day and Father's Day are around the corner, and for some teachers, testing is over.  You're working on assessments, report cards, and cleaning up. The students are hyper, happy, and having a hard time focusing on classwork. The yearbooks are ready, and summer is in the air. Now is the time to prepare for the end of the year, to reflect back on the year that's ending, and to plan for next year. Read on to get some great ideas and printables for Mother's Day, Father's Day, and the end of the year.

 


Read More »

Comments: 1

That's a Wrap: End of the Year Celebration

003The brain likes clean beginnings and clean endings . . . and, calendar check, the end of the year is quickly approaching! Questions begin to form in my mind: Will all the curriculum get covered? Will the assessments and report cards be completed on time? Did I make a difference? Despite all the year-end chaos, it is important to take time to celebrate the educational and emotional journey you and your students will soon be completing. After all, that last day of school can be like a divorce for students who find a haven of belonging and structure at school. 

In the course of my teaching career, I have ended the year in a variety of ways. Below are some of my favorites. I tweaked a few to accommodate the entertainment theme I used in my classroom this year.

Read More »

Comments: 1

What We'll Do Differently Next Year

DSC01483 One of the greatest things about being teachers is that at the end of each year we can evaluate our past teaching experiences, change what didn't work, and plan new strategies with the hope of perfecting our practice. Even after sixteen years of teaching, I find that every June I ponder the passing year and decide what to get rid of, what to work on, and how to change curriculum and instruction so that come September, my classroom runs more smoothly.

I did an informal survey of teachers in my district and teaching friends across the nation, asking them, "What will you do differently next year?" Responses ranged from working on classroom management and time management to creating projects that tap into higher order thinking skills.

Read More »

Paying It Forward

ParentteacherWhen I attend a conference, my goal is to come away with techniques, ideas, or information that will improve my teaching, and my greatest hope is to leave inspired. This year at the Computer-Using Educators conference, both my goal and my hope were realized. Today I want to introduce one of the people who made this happen last week. He's amazing both in how he uses technology in his classroom, and also in who he is as a person and as a teacher. He is one of the people that I aspire to be more like. His name is Brent Coley, and I'm honored to have him write a guest post for this blog.

 


Read More »

Comments: 7

Egyptian Students Speak Out

DSC01346Revere High School is a gateway community, with students from every corner of the globe. This diversity allows our students to truly be citizens of the world. They are able to share their worldview and their experiences with one another. When the revolution ignited in Egypt, many of our students were able to give accurate accounts and personal perspectives of the events as they unfolded.

Read More »

Comments: 2

Updates: Opera, High School Uncut SAT Vocab

DSC_0249On Friday, February 4, 2011, five sophomore boys from Revere High School had a most extraordinary experience: they got to be extras in Teatro Lirico D'Europa's performance of Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor at the Emerson Cutler Majestic Theatre in Boston. I've told you all before how lucky we are that Jenny Kelly, director, provides us with sixty to one hundred free tickets for each of her performances in Boston, but this was straight-up-over-the-top! Teatro operas are quite the extravaganza: there is a full orchestra, and the opera is sung in Italian with English subtitles provided on a screen above the stage. Lucia di Lammermoor features one of the most famous mad scenes in all of opera — and this was the scene in which our boys appeared as extras, as seen in the photo, standing perfectly at attention.

Read More »

Comments: 8

Educating Teens About Drugs — The National Institute on Drug Abuse

DSC01340Drug and alcohol abuse continues to plague teenagers, and parents and teachers are often at a loss about how to handle this important issue. I grew up in the '70s, when there was a great deal of glorification of drug use in the media and very little information about the dark, dangerous side of drug use and addiction. With the advent of the information age, however, there are plenty of resources to help educate and inform students about the dangers of drug use.

Read More »

Comments: 10

100th Day Edition

Ring Around the RosyWell, it's been almost 100 crazy, brainy days of school already! In this special 100th Day edition of my blog, find out how we get excited about learning, enter a contest to win prizes, and find out what guest bloggers Emily Patterson and Kathleen Thomas have to say about teaching a second language in the classroom.

Read More »

Comments: 8

Why You Should Become a National Board Certified Teacher

DSC01296Teachers understand that being a lifelong learner is a core responsibility of their profession. Professional development opportunities abound for teachers, some of it very good and some of it, well, not so good. Of all the professional development activities that I have taken part in during my sixteen-year teaching career, the most powerful, rewarding, and informative one was applying for and receiving National Board Teacher Certification (NBTC). It was also the most difficult and challenging one, but in the end, the process greatly informed my practice, and I truly believe it made me a better teacher.

Read More »

Comments: 15

Organizing and Reorganizing Your Classroom

Photo_19322_20100731Teachers have a LOT of stuff. Especially primary grade teachers and pack rats. I am both. And I am not a naturally organized person. I have to really work to keep things where I can find them. I stalk organizational blogs, look into other people's classrooms for ideas, and buy tons of gadgets and sorters. Nevertheless, it's a daily battle to keep my life from becoming the next episode of Hoarders. Here is the 12 step program that I invented to keep myself organized.

Photo courtesy of graur razvan ionut.

 

Read More »

Comments: 1

Sustained Rapport and Mentoring

Vasicek Integrity Bros 2i2

During the year I often take time to invite groups of students to eat lunch in the classroom. While chatting with the students in this relaxed atmosphere, I really get to know them better. Occasionally, we stumble into meaningful conversations in which I slip in bits of wisdom about making successful choices and leading a 2i2 life. The 2i2 life is a trademark of our classroom. It attempts to capture the importance of living a life of integrity (the “I” in 2i2) in which you push yourself to be the best you can be (see my 212 post). 

Photo of Integrity Bros. Group: Michael, Brendan, Brandon, Tyler, Tristen, Jacob, and Anthony.

 

Read More »

Comments: 5

Student Goals for the New Year

Sparkling CiderNow that the parties and gift giving are beginning to subside, and you haven't had to do lesson plans for awhile, it is time to think about kicking off January right. Inspired by the movie Freedom Writers, I like to start January with a "toast for change."

Photo courtesy Luigi Diamanti.

 

 

 

 

Read More »

Comments: 2

Everything I Need to Know About Teaching, I Learned From 2nd Grade

Christmas postcard
 
As I enjoy the relaxing sounds of Christmas music, a crackling fire in the fireplace, and the view of a twinkling Christmas tree, I am thankful that I have a wonderful job that I love and the opportunity to share some of my thoughts with you here on the Classroom Solutions blog. This week, I'm making a short list of New Year's resolutions and reflecting back on my experiences, and I'm pleased to be able to share my reflections with you.

Read More »

Comments: 1

Spending Educational Minutes Wisely

 

 

ClockWhen Paul Revere needed a job, he competed with the boys in his village. When I needed a job, I competed with the people in the metro-Detroit area. When our students need jobs, they will be competing globally. In the past we didn't need to care how other countries were preparing their children. Now it is essential.

Photo courtesy of healingdream on freedigitalphotos.net.

 

Read More »

Comments: 2

Authentic Praise

Vasicek TeamworkI just read an article by Dennis Prager called "Want to Raise a Good Person? Stop Nurturing Your Child's Self-Esteem." In the article he discusses the pitfalls of the "every child needs a trophy" society. I think Prager frames the problem of catering to the self-esteem of children in an interesting way. While some of his logic may be flawed, it did cause me to pause and reflect upon how I encourage students.

Photo of students trying several times to achieve a goal. It was not a success, but they learned many skills, including resiliency and perseverance.

 

Read More »

Comments: 6

10 Ways to Be Ready for Parent-Teacher Conferences All Year Long

Parent-Teacher Conferences An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. If you do the following things all along, you will not have to rush around at conference time.

Read More »

Comments: 3

The 10/24/7+ Review

Blue brainThe brain stores two kinds of memories, in two different ways. One is spatial/experiential memory. This kind of memory is very easy and automatic. For example, you do not have to memorize the location of each desk in your classroom by doing flashcards. Your brain sees them and makes a mental note of the arrangement of the desks in space. Likewise you don't have to memorize how you felt the time you thought you lost a child on a field trip. You automatically remember the feeling.

The second type of memory is rote memory. This is the type of stuff you must rehearse and memorize to get it to stick. Multiplication tables and state capitals fall into this category. I try to have students experience and visualize vocabulary words to make them more memorable. Read on to see how I review vocabulary words with my students throughout the year to make sure they stick.

This post contains a video demonstration of the word wall review game. Brain image courtesy of clker.com.

Read More »

Thanksgiving Lessons: Plymouth, Pilgrims, and Native Peoples

 

Miss Bindergarten on Thanksgiving Many nations have their own day of Thanksgiving, but only in the United States is it so loved by some and so hated by others. Try these lessons to help your students understand the history and purpose of the holiday, and have fun at the same time!

 

 

Read More »

Comments: 2

The Reflective Practioner

DSC00820Flashback: It's November 2004. Three months since the obnoxious tone signaling the start of a Miami Elementary school day let forth its first bellow of the year. For me, it also signaled the beginning of a nine-month race in many directions. A race to build rapport with the parents. A race to assess the students. A race to initiate IEPs. A race to schedule conferences. A race to learn new technologies and programs for the classroom. A race to keep the virtual in-box from overflowing. A race that I forgot I was running because I didn't schedule time to think about the race. Never again would I forget to schedule time to think about the race.

 

Read More »

Dealing With Angry Parents

Be-angryHave you ever had to deal with an angry parent? They are yelling, screaming, steaming, verbally attacking you, and you freeze, with a blank look on your face. Is this really happening to me? WHY?? Your instincts might tell you to defend yourself by yelling back, or you might be the one to break down and cry, or even flee the scene. Here are some DOs and DON'Ts to help you handle the situation with grace and dignity. Read on to learn some fabulous tips for dealing with an irate parent.

Image courtesy of TopNews.

Read More »

Comments: 1

Student-Led Parent-Teacher Conferences

Conferences 006When I was a kid, I always worried about Parent-Teacher Conference Night. What would my parents say to embarrass me? What would my teacher say I was really like at school? I like to reduce that anxiety in my own students by inviting them to lead the conference. Below is my anxiety reducing recipe for student-led conferences.

Read More »

Comments: 14

Score! Teachers and Parents Team Up to Reach a Common Goal

SHC01If a child's teacher and parents have the same goal — to help the child succeed at school — then they are a TEAM that needs to communicate and cooperate with each other. After all, nothing exists in a vacuum. What affects the child at school will affect the child at home, and vice versa. The two-way school-home connection is the most important factor in the child's education.

Read More »

Comments: 10

Helping Behaviorally Challenged Students

AngrygirlLying, stealing, fighting, running away, using profanity, physically hurting other people (on purpose), and kicking, screaming tantrums. Have you ever felt battle weary after a long day with a child who is considered "behaviorally challenged"? I've been there. Here are some tips to help you and that child make this school year a productive one.

Image courtesy of ZetaBoards.

 


Read More »

Comments: 5

Inexpensive & Educational Holiday Gifts

PresentIt's the holidays, and you love your students. You want to share in the spirit of the season, but you don't want to buy them a piece of junk that will be forgotten as soon as the first Xbox, DS, or iPhone is unwrapped. Anything of value will probably break your budget, especially at this time of the year. What to do? What to do? For $30 or less you can do a vocabulary lesson, test your students' abilities to follow directions, and find them the perfect educational gift.   

Photo courtesy of Francesco Marino.

 

Read More »

Comments: 2

Professional Development: Food for the Teacher's Soul

IMG_0937Different states have different criteria for keeping and maintaining teaching licenses. In New York State, we are required to complete 75 professional development hours every five years to maintain our NYS professional certification. I know what you are thinking: there just isn't enough time in the day. How do we fit in so many professional development hours? You are not alone. I recently questioned my sanity in trying to fit a conference into my already overcrowded agenda. Last Thursday, I traveled to the 2010 New York State Middle School Association (NYSMSA) Conference in Rochester, New York. It was a transformative journey that I felt was worth sharing. (This post includes Jack Berckemeyer videos.)

 

Read More »

Comments: 11

Service Learning: The Future Teachers Club of Revere

DSC01050 

Service learning provides students with an opportunity to both teach and learn. It combines community service, instruction, and reflection in order to help teach responsibility, respect, leadership, and values.

Read More »

Browse by Grade
PreK - K1 - 23 - 56 - 89 - 12
Real Teachers’ Tips & Teaching Strategies
FacebookFacebookTwitterRSS

Advertisement

The opinions expressed in Classroom Solutions are strictly those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Scholastic Inc.