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Teaching about Cinco De Mayo using ELD strategies

Here are exciting, valuable, and easy to prep ELD strategies to use when teaching about Cinco de Mayo!!!


KWL Chart: Using chart paper I write at the top K W L, The K stands for what do you know about the topic, the W stands for what do you want to learn about the topic, and the L stands for what did you learn about the topic. At this time my students are learning about Mexico so the K stands for what do you know about Mexico, the W stands for what do you want to learn about Mexico and the L stands for what did you learn about Mexico. Applying this to Cinco De Mayo, What do you KNOW about Cinco De Mayo? What do you WANT to learn about Cinco De Mayo? What did you LEARN about Cinco De Mayo?

Narrative input chart: Using chart paper, I draw a visual representation of the battle that took place in Puebla, Mexico. I tell the events of the battle between the outnumbered Mexican army and the French soldiers by drawing pictures to go along with the story. Eventually, the students retell the story and then add to it. 

Think-Pair-Share: The students are given a question. Each student thinks about what they are going to say, then pairs up with another student and shares out his/her idea with a classmate. For example have the students think about important facts about Cinco De Mayo, then pair up with a classmate and share out. A great way to check for understanding and to see if the students are listening to each other is to ask the students to share what their partner said. 
Look to this website for more ideas on celebrating Mexico: http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/teach.jsp

KwlMexican costumes  

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