About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Targeted Assistance

Diane Trim, an editor at Magna Publications, had a great idea:  20-minuted targeted educational videos.

Here’s the deal.  Teachers often need help with one specific aspect of teaching or classroom management.  Instead of spending a whole day talking about that one aspect (or talking about related or even unrelated aspects), the topic can be addressed in about 20 minutes. 

The topic is usually posed in question form.  How can I make sure students just “got” what I taught?  How can I engage students right from the beginning of class?  How can I get kids to work efficiently as groups?  How can I use volunteers effectively in my classroom?

There are 20-minute targeted videos for principals, too.  How can I use committees more effectively?  What can I do to promote a positive school climate?

The key to all of the videos is that they contain specific steps, specific examples, or specific suggestions of what the teacher or principal can do.  You’ll note that the key word here is “specific.”  And they won’t eat up your staff development budget either.

Image001-1  I’m so onboard with this concept that currently I’m in Wisconsin making a few of these 20 –minute videos (after 25 years as a school administrator, I ought to know something).  Example next week. Diane’s blog is found on Inside the School.

Also next week:  Look for a new feature on this blog -- Career Questions.  Teachers and administrators ask practical questions or present problems that are part of daily operations in schools.

 

 

Comments

Seems like a great way to condense the information to what teachers are most likely to have problems with. Spending 20 minutes to watch a video is a lot more time efficient and will give the teacher more time for lesson plans etc.

Post Comment

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign In

Advertisement

Advertisement

Categories

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in Practical Leadership are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.