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Tracking Cloud Trekking

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CDW released the results of their Cloud Computing Tracking Poll. 1,200 IT professionals were surveyed to assess current and future cloud computing use.

According to the polll, 28% of U.S. business, government, healthcare and education organizations are using cloud computing, and that 73% reported the first step was single cloud application. Furthermore, 84% of those polled confirm that they have already employed at least one cloud application. This seems to be a testing of the waters, because most have not identified themselves as “Cloud Users”.

CDW defines cloud computing as a model for enabling convenient, on-demand access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications and services) that can be rapidly provisioned.  

David Cottingham, senior director, managed services at CDW says,  “With thoughtful planning, organizations can realize benefits that align directly with their organizational goals: consolidated IT infrastructure, reduced IT energy and capital costs, and ‘anywhere’ access to documents and applications.”    
 
The breakdown of cloud application usage was email 50%, file storage 39%, Web and video conferencing, 36 and 32 percent, respectively, and online learning 34 percent.

When asked about the estimated potential to operate in the cloud, the IT pros reported that only 42% of their current services would fit, but planned to spend 34% of their IT budget on cloud computing by 2016. They see that as saving over 30% of their IT budget by using cloud resources and applications. And even those respondents who were non-cloud users expect to spend 28% of their budget on cloud computing in the same time period.

The bottom line was that 84%  of current cloud users reported they cut application costs by moving to the cloud, and that the average savings on applications moved to the cloud was 21%.

“The potential to cut costs while maintaining or even enhancing computing capabilities for end users presents a compelling case for investment in cloud computing,” Cottingham said.  Furthermore, “The fact that even current cloud users anticipate spending just a third of their IT budget on cloud computing within five years suggests that before wide-scale implementation, IT managers are taking a hard look at their IT governance, architecture, security and other prerequisites for cloud computing, in order to ensure that their implementations are successful.”

More about the survey:

The CDW Cloud Computing Tracking Poll includes findings specific to each of the eight industries surveyed during March 2011:  small businesses, medium businesses, large businesses, the Federal government, state and local governments, healthcare, higher education and K-12 public schools.  The survey sample includes 150 individuals from each industry who identified themselves as familiar with their organization’s use of, or plans for, cloud computing.  The margin of error for the total sample is ±2.7 percent at a 95 percent confidence level. The margin of error for each industry sample is ±8.0 percent at a 95 percent confidence level.  

 
Get survey copies and learn more about cloud computing:

For a copy of the complete CDW 2011 Cloud Computing Tracking Poll, please visit http://www.cdw.com/cloudtrackingpoll. For more about CDW’s cloud computing capabilities and offerings, please visit http://www.cdw.com/cloud.

About CDW

CDW http://www.cdw.com/ is a leading provider of technology solutions for business, government, education and healthcare.

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