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Passionate Communication

Ken

A friend of mine told me that what we do is make someone else’s story our own. I agree with that, in part, but that can never be the complete goal. For instance, almost anyone can learn the specifications of a product, and then regurgitate them into a post, but that’s only understandable to a very small population of readers. What’s necessary is passionate communication. By that I mean, talking to someone at the company, as high up as you can get, talking to users beyond just those given to you in a press release, and most importantly—figuring out the solution or product yourself. That last part is doing your homework. The real job is to take what you’ve learned, and make it understandable to the widest range of audience, and at the same time make it appropriate to those with higher-level understanding, too. Right, it’s a lot like teaching.

In my time covering education technology I’ve been lucky enough to work for two magazine publishers, at different publications, who really understand going to the source, being creative, passionate, and taking the reporting beyond slapping a press release on a page. With that kind of support, sharing education products through an educator’s eyes has helped me know what products can do in real classrooms. I’ve met educators using products and passionate marketplace people. I’ve walked conferences interviewing at booths, and walked in schools interviewing administrators, staff, students, and parents. In every case, I’ve never stopped at just taking the rehearsed story line, but instead I’ve tried to make the people I’ve interviewed feel comfortable enough to really tell me the story behind a product, or how a product is really being used. I have been blessed to be able to do that.

There are many stages in a career, and for me, it’s been careers, so at the end of this stage I wanted my final post at Scholastic to be a positive reminder, lesson if you will, of what is really important. Certainly, you need to convey all the features and specifications appropriate, but if you forget the passion and the education reasons for using a product or solution, you’ve bypassed the main story line, and most likely have something that is unreadable or clear to the people you really want to reach.

I know that changing education doesn’t always require technology, but technology needs to be part of the solution. We need more positive stories from real schools, dealing with real issues, in these bad times. We need to hear more than PowerPoint for interactive devices, and simple lessons for software and apps. And while I love that academies have the backing to do most anything they think, there are public school districts doing amazing things that we never hear about—in places we never hear about. If there is a call to action that I can leave with—that’s it—let’s here more from those voices—it makes common sense to do so.

While I can’t say I’ve enjoyed every minute, I can say that I’ve enjoyed passionately communicating with those who would listen and talk new ideas—and I hope to find a place to keep doing that. For now—from here—until we meet again...

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Ken, You have been inspiring and inspired in your coverage of the great things going on in schools and in the industry. I will miss seeing your byline, but will look for you in the Twittersphere. Bravo to you for all you've contributed to education.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in The Royal Treatment are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.