About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Passionate Communication

Ken

A friend of mine told me that what we do is make someone else’s story our own. I agree with that, in part, but that can never be the complete goal. For instance, almost anyone can learn the specifications of a product, and then regurgitate them into a post, but that’s only understandable to a very small population of readers. What’s necessary is passionate communication. By that I mean, talking to someone at the company, as high up as you can get, talking to users beyond just those given to you in a press release, and most importantly—figuring out the solution or product yourself. That last part is doing your homework. The real job is to take what you’ve learned, and make it understandable to the widest range of audience, and at the same time make it appropriate to those with higher-level understanding, too. Right, it’s a lot like teaching.

In my time covering education technology I’ve been lucky enough to work for two magazine publishers, at different publications, who really understand going to the source, being creative, passionate, and taking the reporting beyond slapping a press release on a page. With that kind of support, sharing education products through an educator’s eyes has helped me know what products can do in real classrooms. I’ve met educators using products and passionate marketplace people. I’ve walked conferences interviewing at booths, and walked in schools interviewing administrators, staff, students, and parents. In every case, I’ve never stopped at just taking the rehearsed story line, but instead I’ve tried to make the people I’ve interviewed feel comfortable enough to really tell me the story behind a product, or how a product is really being used. I have been blessed to be able to do that.

There are many stages in a career, and for me, it’s been careers, so at the end of this stage I wanted my final post at Scholastic to be a positive reminder, lesson if you will, of what is really important. Certainly, you need to convey all the features and specifications appropriate, but if you forget the passion and the education reasons for using a product or solution, you’ve bypassed the main story line, and most likely have something that is unreadable or clear to the people you really want to reach.

I know that changing education doesn’t always require technology, but technology needs to be part of the solution. We need more positive stories from real schools, dealing with real issues, in these bad times. We need to hear more than PowerPoint for interactive devices, and simple lessons for software and apps. And while I love that academies have the backing to do most anything they think, there are public school districts doing amazing things that we never hear about—in places we never hear about. If there is a call to action that I can leave with—that’s it—let’s here more from those voices—it makes common sense to do so.

While I can’t say I’ve enjoyed every minute, I can say that I’ve enjoyed passionately communicating with those who would listen and talk new ideas—and I hope to find a place to keep doing that. For now—from here—until we meet again...

Getting Smart with Tom Vander Ark: Podcast

When I called for positive education voices, Tom Vander Ark agreed to share. You'll find out about his book, TVA Getting Smart, as well as his predictions for 2014. I recommend this one as a faculty meeting, administrative council, professional development discussion starter. Listen to another voice for positive education and education technology change.

Enjoy and learn by listening to Getting Smart with Tom Vander Ark:
(Embedded player requires Flash) 

MP3 Link: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/753/show_2753779.mp3

ITunes Link: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

Stop Teaching from the Shadows

BoardshadowTeaching in the shadows at the whiteboard is equivalent to teaching in front of a dusty chalkboard. It’s what drove the overhead projectors out of the bowling alleys and into the classrooms more than 20 years ago. If your teachers have only the interactive technology to block the board and cast a shadow on a lesson, it's time to stand back to get a better view. And if you're an administrator just looking for interactive choices, and not sure if teachers will use them, there's a few helpful thoughts here for you, too.

Getting teachers away from the from the front of the classroom, and into the mix, with students won’t quite look like individual instruction, but it will get more actors to participate on the learning stage. And that stage can be the entire classroom.

In my day, the only way to teach interactively (with tech) was by using a projector and whiteboard with a cheap, wireless mouse. If you walked around the room, but not too far, you could control the teacher-station computer with the wireless mouse, and if you had a wireless keyboard, you could let students around the room type in answers and sentences. Having said all that, I’m certain there are teachers out there still doing it, or thinking about trying it. In the old days, I did more, I actually bought a wireless keyboard and mouse for each of my staff members. Oh, I bought a lot of batteries, too! That was then and this is now...

There is no reason you should go the wireless mouse/keyboard direction today. Almost every whiteboard, document camera, response system, or projector company makes or supplies a far better tablet/slate classroom teaching/presentation device. And many interactive device companies will, or are offering software solutions that will work with iPads and other computer tablets. That software will allow teachers the same classroom instruction opportunities, and most likely more, and the options for getting teachers out of the shadows continues to expand.

If you still question whether teachers will use the equipment, maybe this answer from a recent interview will help. After observing many teachers in a school using tablet/slate/pad controllers easil, I asked, “You seem to handle teaching from anywhere in the classroom, and operating software on your whiteboard easily with that device. What would you say to teachers, who may be a bit leery of walking away from the stylus at the board?” The teacher looked at me, smiled, and said, “I pretend it’s a mouse.” Now, that was simple to understand, and it reminded me of my wireless mouse and keyboard years ago. It was easy to do, because she thought of it as familiar.

Because there's a choice when it comes to these devices, my advice is to try them out to see which is best for your needs. Choosing one that fits into your existing tech mix may be best, but testing outside possibilities is always a good call, too. You may find a gem that teachers find easier to use. Remember, this may be a purchase you'll live with for a long time. Check ease of use, set-up, battery, wireless distance and compatability, as well as support and upkeep. Unlike my cheap wireless mouse and keyboard, running these products through actual teaching lessons, before deciding, makes a lot of price/common sense.

Here are some companies (random order) that provide interactive ways (Pads, Slates, Tablets) and software to interactively launch a teacher out of the whiteboard shadows and into the classroom light with their students:

eInstruction

ELMO

Promethean

Dymo/Mimio

Qwizdom

QOMO HiteVision

SMART Technologies

Luidia

Califone

Apple (iPad)

Teaching with Tech: Josh Stumpenhorst Podcast

Josh Stumpenhorst (@stumpteacher), Chicago 6th grade language arts and social studies teacher, talks classroom Superman5technology  with Ken Royal at the Royal Treatment. Listen to a fresh voice with new ideas for enhancing student learning and projects by using technology. Great teaching advice for veteran and new teachers, as well as district and school leaders.

If you would like to voice your own positive education voice, please check the directions and how  at DO SOMETHING: Positive Voices Wanted to submit your own. Join the campaign to hear fresh voices! It's easy to do.

Listen to Josh Stumpenhorst: Teaching with Technology.

Embedded Player (requires Flash):

MP3: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/674/show_2674679.mp3

iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

Principal Dave Meister: Leadership Podcast

DaveMeisterListen as Principal Dave Meister (@phsprincipal), Paris High School, Paris, Illinois shares specific examples of education and technology leadership during a Ken Royal interview. Leading by example takes a bit of courage, but the rewards are exciting. This interview is part of a Positive Education Voices campaign. Educators DOING!

Here's how to voice your own: DO SOMETHING!: Positive Education Voices Wanted

Listen in your choice of media: embedded Flash player, MP3, or at iTunes:

 MP3: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/645/show_2645387.mp3

iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

DO SOMETHING!: Positive Education Voices Wanted

Let’s DO SOMETHING!

I said something a few weeks back that I just can’t shake. As a young teacher, I confronted a KenR2Superintendent with 10 things we should be doing. He looked at me and quietly said, “What are you going to do about it?” He was right, and I never forgot it. I’ve been sitting too long thinking rather than doing. While it lasts, I have a vehicle and place to post, which may help the cause—a little.

The idea involves simple recordings (podcasts if you will) edited together in a newsworthy way. I’ll supply the intro and do the segue/transitions. (Note: audio only)

I'd like to do a lot of these show and tell interviews—have one posted as a new show each day. Figurin’ those PLN and EdChat talks can also be great sparks, as well as great educator resources—to take the discussions beyond just the 140 Twitter character posts each evening. I’ll post them here, at Scholastic, as well as at the Radio Royal Treatment—with everything going to iTunes, as well as archived. Transcripts can be available if necessary, too.

Here's how:

Record answers to fit the script below (you can be creative), saving as MP3 or Wav files works well, but I can work around most any clean, audio format. No worries about Ahhhsss and Ummmmms; I’ll edit it those out. Natural talk is the key, and what you want to say comes out just right in every conversation you have. ;>) Take each of the parts as a separate take, or all together. Make them short bits though. I’ve discovered that most will listen to a short bit, and rambling is a sleeper. You can refer to the topic during your responses, as well as to me (Ken)—as if I’m actually with you. Want these to sound like we’re in the same room, or having the conversation. 

I know that I don’t have to tell you that a sense of humor is great, and pauses for effect OK. YouSendIt is free online, and will send larger files easily, but any way they get here is fine.

Any tech difficulties, we can figure them out. And, any suggestions for the idea, or additional “talkers” would be welcomed! Twitter is a wonderful contact place for this: @kenroyal ( https://twitter.com/kenroyal)

1. Choose one, or a few points you’ve been trying to make—get across—to educators and administrators. Three is always a nice, odd number. ;>) No ankle biters here; we'll leave the grumping to others! I’m looking for positive, specific suggestions, proposals, for education and education tech how tos.

2. Tout Things YOU ARE DOING to make things happen. Be as specific as you can to make your point.

3. Promote yourself—URLs and name drop. There's nothing wrong with educators branding themselves.

4. Misc. – Something else? This could be a future look/trend/hope…

Google+ The Next Education Meeting Place

I’ve been trying to figure out where the next collaboration and meeting place would be for educators. Google_plusLike the Old West, I’ve been feeling a bit advertising pushed on Twitter and as for FaceBook the Yogi line about it’s too crowded—no one goes there anymore is starting to fit. For a guy who began with AOL chat in it’s earliest stages, it seems the options for actual teacher collaboration are pretty much the same—just more people doing it outside the four walls. So, I was a bit leery of Google+, even though I’d been a Google user for a very long time. I had so much else going on, so it seemed to me Google+ would be just another thing to juggle, and heck, was there anything there for me beyond sharing thoughts about music, or video, or the latest TV program?

A few days ago, a friend, Peter Vogel (see Editor's Notes) gave me a small push by way of Twitter. Peter KenR2 Pvasked, “Are you using Google+?” And I pretty much said that I was studying the idea, but didn’t think there’d be anything for me there. I pretty much asked, “Why would I want to be there?”

What follows is our Twitter conversation, so if you haven’t tried Google+ you’ll see that it’s pretty easy to do. If you have a Google login, you’re all set, and if you don’t, create one. You’ll find it here: https://plus.google.com/. And if you know Google, things don’t remain constant for long, so something new from them is probably going to happen… soon. Jump in, create some education and education tech circles. Maybe it’s the next place  for us to gather and share—outside the faculty room, or passing in the hall.

KR: Peter, any problems with Google+ and why would I go there?

PV: No, no problems with G+ whatsoever. The environment is terrific. I suggest it is perfect for someone like you with lots to share.

PV: You are a blogger.  G+ is a natural fit for you. I enjoy writing, but somewhere between a tweet and full-on blogging.

PV: Grab an "instant circle" of several hundred educators and you'll find the stream is instantly alive. The threading is superb.

PV: Have you filled out profile and added a photo/avatar?

PV: Have you added that circle? Keep it as a separate circle so you can edit it later. Don't make it "general". These should all be pretty good.

KR: Actually created an Education circle after sticking everyone into a friends one. Dragged 8 there to start. Still figuring this out.

KR: Which is another way of saying that I haven't a clue yet. ;>)

PV: That's OK. Just add my circle. You should see the message from me. Then add that circle. You've already added me so you seeing my traffic.

PV: Make a posting Ken. Anything. About a camera etc. Include a link to see how G+ handles them. Make posting "public."

KR: Cool. Thanks Teach!

KR: Peter. I've posted a comment. You have at least one person in your circle I'd rather not add. What's the work around there?

PV: Right, you just drop them from the circle once you've added it and they are gone.

PV: The list is reasonably well but not perfectly vetted.

PV: Good, you've added the circle. Now for the profile statements and you are good to go.

KR: You're right, this is quite cool, and may be something for sure. Read some feeds.

Editor’s Notes:

My Google+ Mentor and Friend:

Peter Vogel, Vancouver BC, Canada

Vogel is an ICT/Physics teacher, lifelong learner, Internet/tech newspaper columnist, Network admin, PM & Premier's SciTech, CAP 2011 winner. CERN HST 2011. G+ user

Peter’s works primarily in the area of Information Technology (ICT) with a focus on classroom applications, and in physics. Following a one month stay at CERN and the Large Hadron Collider , he developed an interest in particle physics. Peter is very active on Twitter (http://twitter.com/petervogel) and maintains various web sites and other online publications. Here’s an example, check it out if you enjoy student balsa wood constructions:  http://www.balsabridge.com/

Education Think Tank NYC

I’ve been invited to participate in an Education Think Tank in NYC sponsored by Dell on Saturday. I’ve Ttddiscovered that most educators will attend speaking and learning events on Saturdays. Dell and other companies holding events for educators need some credit. Companies are getting the idea that educators have more influence in decision-making and change than they once thought. These events, as well as online teaching communities at education and tech company sites show the necessity to strengthen teacher partnerships to help district education and technology goals. To be perfectly blunt, what teachers want for teaching students is important, and it influences products and solutions sought and possibly purchased.

One of my favorite people, Eric Sheninger @NMHS_Principal, is moderating the NYC event onsite, and he’s getting a bit of online correspondent help from Tom Whitby @tomwhitby, who is a positive PLN TwitterWorld education force. I jokingly say that I discovered Eric, who is the consummate education-administrator entrepreneur, and that Tom and I share the same sense of humor, and passion to share.
BTW, I followed Sheninger around one day. He's the real deal. I watched him start the day, handle a parent situation, organize a professional development workshop, talk with students (they all know him, treat him like their teacher, and enjoy interacting with his sense of humor), gave me the Royal Treament building tour, and then at the end of a long day Skype a conference. I missed a lot, because I couldn't keep up!

First of all, I’m honored to take part in the event. I don’t usually get a chance to participate, and I’m excited to get to meet people I’ve only heard about—or should I say viewed tweets from—zipping through the columns of my TweetDeck.

Beyond attending, I also want to see how the event is being done. I recently asked Eric Sheninger about a very successful streaming event he held at New Milford High School that involved administrators, teachers, students, parents, and technology. I attended that one online. I told Eric that I was not only impressed with the content, but the streaming as well. I shared that link out, after the fact, many times. I’m just intrigued by the how to of these types of events, and believe that they should be done more frequently. I’ll go further, I’d like to see these streaming events a regular occurrence in all districts. Think of the possibilities—local unconferences, show and tells, best practices, science, math and tech expos, professional development, and the list goes on.

Here’s what’s needed to do that: An easy and affordable way for districts to stream. Box something up that works with very little geek connections necessary, and price it for education—not for corporate. If you want someone to manage that project, call me! I’m not talking Skype or FaceTime here; I’m talking professionally streamed material, including professional development. Right now, third party, online operations do this, some with expensive software/server/hardware, but really, there’s no magic here, and it should be more widely accessible beyond corporate ventures. I’m not talking free options either. I know they are out there, but it’s not perfect enough for prime time education. So, I’m looking forward to the tech talk, but I’m also scouting out the how to for this event.

Here are a few links to give you more information on the event as well as a list of the NYC participants and their Twitter handles. There is also online participation. Join us! And yes, Dell actually has a Snow White working for their education group. I’ve met her, but didn’t sing. ;>)

Register at:

http://dellthinktank.eventbrite.com/

Streamed at:

http://www.fittotweet.com/live/dellthinktank-edu/

Eric Sheninger, @NMHS_Principal (Moderator)
Tom Whitby, @tomwhitby (Online Correspondent)
Adam Bellow, @adambellow
Dr. Brian Chinni, @drbpchinni
Erik Endreses, @erikendress
Aaron Eyler, @aaron_eyler
Renny Fong, @timeoutdad
Adam Garry, @agarry22
Michele Glaze, @PMicheleGlaze
Erica Hartman, @elh
Kathy Ishizuka, @kishizuka
Kevin Jarrett, @kjarrett
Michelle Lampinen, @MichLampinen
Susan McPherson, @susanmcp1
Lisa Nielsen, @InnovativeEdu
Mike Parent, @mikeparent
Mary Rice-Boothe, @Edu_Traveler
Ken Royal, @kenroyal
Sarah Thomas, @teach2connect
Snow White, @snowwhiteatdell

Kensington: There's A Lock For That!

Brian Baltezore, Senior Product Manager at Kensington tells Ken Royal that there is a lock for that iPad, too. The Royal Treatment covers pioneer device lock company Kensington as it keeps up with tablets in the changing school and work environment.

Listen to the interview:

MP3 Listening: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/323/show_2323443.mp3

iTunes Listening: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

Empowering Writers

Dea2 Dea Auray, Co-Founder of Empowering Writers shares some K12 writing philosophy with Ken Royal at The Royal Treatment. Teaching students the skills they need to be great writers just doesn't happen without strategies for an organized game plan. Auray shares how you can empower your classroom of writers, as well as become a better teacher of writing across the grades and curriculum. In this year of Common Core changes, you can't afford to miss listening to this episode.

Listen to Empowering Writers (Embedded player requires Flash) :

MP3 Listening Link: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/323/show_2323443.mp3

iTunes Listening: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

Accelerate: Standard Deviants Resources

SamGenovese_as_Hiro copy
At the recent ISTE 2011 Conference I had a chance to demo an Biology module by a group of very cleaver, dare I say deviant, education resource producers from a company called Cerebellum. It was fun learning, and fully packaged for teaching the things that used to take me binders full of resource gathering. Beyond that, the pre lesson, actual lessons, and post lesson activities and assessments were anything but traditional. I do know that any teacher could teach biology by using it, and students would love the irreverant style. I did make the comment that students would most likely want to create their own videos and characters after experiencing the lessons. Afterward, I interviewed spokeperson Sam Genovese (image above as "Hiro the Dog Eater") from Cerebellum, who also acts in some of the video resource scenes. You may learn enough about Standard Deviants Accelerate to give it a try.

Q: How is Standard Deviants Accelerate different from other online resources?

Ans: We had a few goals when creating Standard Deviants Accelerate:

1)  Save teachers time.

2) Make it intuitive and easy to use, because no teacher should have to use a personal day to learn a new online program.

3) Make it a comprehensive subject-based learning resource that is flexible for teachers and students alike.

4) Create new and unique Standard Deviants video, audio, and testing materials that are only available on SD Accelerate.

Q: How will teachers benefit from using this platform?

Ans: Accelerate will save teachers time. Grading rubrics are provided for relevant assignments, however we know that each classroom has different needs, so we made the rubrics editable via simple click-and-type. Additionally, Accelerate pushes performance data to teachers for struggling students. This frees teachers from constantly having to log in to get time-sensitive data about students in need of more help, thus providing teachers have more time to teach.

Q: Can you explain the methodology in the structure of the subjects’ material?

Ans: Differentiated instruction, RTI and creative critical thinking are the backbone of Accelerate's methodology. 

A quiz taken at the end of a module is informed by smaller quizzes taken at the beginning of the module.  It really gets interesting with the critical thinking questions, though. Accelerate will push either a foundational or an enrichment critical thinking question to the student based on that student's unique performance on prior assignments. This type of instruction happens dozens of times over the course of an entire subject. 

Accelerate's approach to RTI is to literally send red flags to teachers when students are underperforming, so as to allow the teacher to respond in a timely manner. 

Students are asked time and again to approach the material from creative angles and think for themselves.  This makes the subject matter relevant to their lives, makes it real and makes it totally engaging.

Q: Why should this be used in the classroom?

Ans: For teachers, Accelerate is about flexibility and saving time.  Sure, there is a logical pathway to how Accelerate's lessons are organized and presented, but the entire system is designed to allow teachers to manage their classrooms in the ways they see fit. Teachers can have students submit assignments electronically or as printouts; additionally, Accelerate can be used directly in the classroom or assigned as homework or as a long-term assignment—the teacher is in control.

For students, Accelerate is a dynamic learning environment that provides not only Standard Deviants video programming, but also assignments with twists that really make the students engage with the material.  I mean, where else are students going to be asked to explain mitosis in rhyming couplets?

College Readiness: Complete Student Preparation

An Andrew Vreeke, President and CEO of SureScore gets the Royal Treatment from Ken Royal about life-long student college readiness preparation. If you thought that college preparation was only for juniors and seniors, Vreeke has a game plan that may cause you to rethink and game change. Find out more about SureScore, and quite possibly how planning for students is moving beyond the playground.

Listen to the Interview (Embedded player requires Flash):

MP3 Listening Link: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/292/show_2292267.mp3

iTunes Listening: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

1:1 Online Instruction: Alternative Eds New Look

D EDUCATION 2020 041 The Royal Treatment talks with Gene Storz, Chief Learning Officer, about Education 2020. Hopper pic Joanne E. Hopper, Ed.D. Director of Education Services St. Clair County RESA, Marysville, MI, and Al Vigh, Frontiers Program Director for the Wyoming Public Schools will join us to share how they are using 2020 in their districts. Here's a new look to alternative education. Background: Education 2020 (e2020) is a provider of one-on-one online instruction in core and elective courses for students in grades 6-12.

Listen to the 1:1 Online Instruction discussion (embedded player requires Flash):

MP3 Link: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/258/show_2258907.mp3

iTunes Link: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

Scholastic Live: iPads & Common Core

  Stage1
 Dan_Brenner Scholastic Administrator’s August Live Tech Event was an exciting and unique  Edward_Salinaevent for more than 200 education guests and marketplace experts. Speakers included Dan Brenner, Rosyln, Long Island superintendent and Ed Salina, Plainridge superintendent talking How To District iPad. To round out the event, Susan Gendron (former Maine education leader and 1:1 advocate), now coordinator for Gendron SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium discussed the NEW Common Core, and how assessments in Reading and Math would change, as well as what that would mean for administrators, educators, and professional development.

Both presentations at the Scholastic Live Tech Event placed strong emphasis on training, which makes me think that 2012 will be The Year of Professional Development. The presenters gave educators high marks for making things works, and also agreed that administrators can make things happen, because they are closer to the purse strings.

Brenner and Salina said making tech changes happen for the same price as without tech, especially savings in the area of textbook purchases, makes tech an easier sell to board members and the community.

While Brenner and Salina are using iPads for their students, in their respective districts, they are open to other technologies as they develop, but for now and for them, nothing touches the iPad. They do recommend a stylus for writing and a rubberized keyboard to cut down on the typing noise. BTW, the keyboard idea came from their students, who discovered that the need for keyboards was lacking in the project launch. I agree with the kids.

Gendron, who is known for her Maine 1:1 tech trail blazing prefaced her talk with a caution that keying into one device isn’t the answer, and that educators should remain open. She also stated that the new common core assessments would all require technology to help students verify and back up reading, writing and math work. We’re looking at more in-depth work in a trimmed down (for importance) curriculum, as well as everything moved down 2 to 3 grades levels, especially in math. Gendron says that it will be quite an adjustment and administrators will need to lead the charge.

A great question was asked by a school librarian, who wanted to know what part she and other librarians would play in the new common core. Gendron said that the importance of librarians and library media specialists would be even more invaluable to the new reading, research, and assessment plans.

Links to Take Away

iPad Link: http://roslynipadforum.wordpress.com/

If you’re thinking of doing an iPad project, Dan Brenner has done some of the work for you. Don’t re-invent the wheel—check his site first.

Sue Gendron shared a great Lexile Analyzer Link:Photo[5]

Lexile analyzer: lexile.com/analyzer/

Participating Sponsors for the Scholastic Live Event: 

Canon USA

DYMO/Mimio

Follett Software

Grand Canyon University

Lexia Learning

Panasonic System Networks

Teq

Bring Your Own Tech to School

Crawford_Jeffrey Mr Jeff Crawford is Manager of Networking and Security at East Grand Rapids Public Schools, MI. Listen as he discusses Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) in schools with Ken Royal at The Royal Treatment. Hear Crawford's 1:1 philosophy, and learn how his district handles BYOT student devices, and more. The right solutions involves more than the right hardware, and your idea of 1:1 may change completely. Teachers are the key.

Listen to Bring Your Own Tech (Embedded Player Requires Flash):

MP3 Listening: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/202/show_2202825.mp3

iTunes Listening: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

Discovery Education Outreach & Techbooks

Scott_kinney3 Learn about new-age teaching, education collaboration, and Techbooks. Scott Kinney, Discovery Education's Senior VP for Global Professional Development, Policy, and Education Outreach gets The Royal Treatment. Find out about the global Discovery Education Network, and how to join.

Listen to the interview (embedded player requires Flash):

MP3 Link: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/191/show_2191267.mp3

iTunes Link: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

Sound Classroom Audio

Sound
What's sound have to do with learning? 

I was reminded of the importance sound plays in learning this week, and of all places, at a golf driving range.  A friend, watching my inconsistent windmill hitting of golf balls hooked me up with something called Sonic Golf. You put this transmitter into the club shaft, attach a receiver to your belt, and insert ear buds—then you swing and listen. I quickly learned to specifically listen to the rhytym of my swing, the quiet associated with the transition/change in direction, and the speed. Sound feedback resulted in hitting the golf ball on the button—consistently. Learning can benefit by taking advantage of the science of listening.

What about sound within classrooms, and for teachers, kids, listening and learning?

I’ve long been a proponent of sound in the classroom. As a teacher, I toyed with all sorts of ways to hook up a microphone and simple speakers, so quiet students could be heard in a classroom. The best student presentation suffers when the audience can’t hear it, and no amount of  “speak louder” reminders will help. I also remember rigging up old record players with mics, because they had speakers—and sort of worked. Just that, was an improvement in a regular classroom. And by saying old record player, I’ve, again, dated myself.

As instructional tech specialist, I was forever looking for ways to inexpensively tie our teachers and computers into the ceiling speakers. I usually started with teachers willing to experiment, but most often with those who had students with IEPs that included sound options. It made those students, with the obvious hearing needs, more successful, and teachers discovered that the rest of the class benefited as well. At first, we used handheld microphones. Not the best for orchestrating a class, but certainly exciting for kids. Then, we graduated to a few devices that hung like necklaces, and left teaching hands free. It’s amazing how many of those devices I saw in the hallway, hanging from teachers’ necks, because they had gotten used to them, and forgotten to remove them.

I know there are scientific studies to prove all this sound theory, but the bottom line is really to learn the art of listening, you just can’t be told to do it. I will bet you that in most classrooms that are sound improved, teachers don’t have to remind students to listen, and teachers don’t have to repeat what they say—as often. It’s not only the students on IEPs who benefit; it’s the entire class, as well as the teacher. So, if you haven’t, consider making classrooms sound ready in newer buildings, and sound improved in older ones. 

Here’s a hyperlinked list of companies that do classroom audio well. Visit their sites for more.

1.  SMART Technologies Audio Classroom Amplification System

2.  FrontRow To Go and Pro Digital

3.  Califone Infrared Classroom Audio System and Califone

4.  LightSpeed REDCAT and TOPCAT 

5.  Panasonic All-In One Portable Sound System

6.  Cetacea Sound Astronaut 

7.  TeachLogic VoiceLink Plus sound system

8.  Calypso System’s WCM-RF Classroom Voice Amplification Solution and ezRoom 

9.  Epson AP-60 Sound Enhancement System

10. Promethean ActivSound 

11. Extron VoiceLift 

12. Crestron FreeSpeech

Phil Mickelson Talks Teachers Academy

Phil Phil Mickelson, tees up some education talk with Ken Royal at The Royal Treatment. Phil Mickelson, professional golfer and science education fan talks about the ExxonMobil Teachers Academy that he and his wife, Amy, began more than 6 years ago. The Mickelsons are a class act, with a passion for helping science and math teachers bring experiential lessons and techniques back to their classes, schools, and district. Phil goes from Royal St. Georges to The Royal Treatment, and it's just par for the course with this class act.
Listen to the interview:


Embedded Player (requires Flash):

MP3 Podcast Link: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/2/124/show_2124365.mp3

iTunes Link: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

Future Shaping: Anthony Salcito MSFT

Anthony Salcito at Lenovo ThinkTank 2011 Anyone who cares about student learning in this wireless and digital age will find a kindred spirit in Anthony Salcito. He’s the Vice President, Worldwide Public Sector Education for Microsoft, and one of my favorite people in the ed tech world. When he talks, he says things that I’ve been thinking for years, only when he says them, the ideas sound better. If you’ve ever fought for student learning, or technology for kids and schools, you’d be comfortable in a conversation with Anthony. Furthermore, his Shape the Future initiative is helping to make access to technology a right and not a privilege for every student everywhere.  Please check out Anthony’s post Making Access to Technology a Reality via Shape the Future at his Education Insights blog for more.

Recently, at Lenovo’s (Intel) ThinkTank 2011 event in Washington, DC, Anthony shared that “Along with passionate heroes for classroom change, there is also a great need for scalability for successful change—and that may be the greatest obstacle for transforming education." Salcito hopes to play a role in that scalability for change, as well as in empowering the children of the world. Microsoft supports ATC21S, Assessment of Teaching for 21st-Century Skills, and Shape the Future, so there’s a pretty good team backing him, and you couldn’t have a better person leading the charge.

Illinicloud CDW-G at ISTE: D'Orio Cloud Search

Scholastic Administrator Executive Editor Wayne D'Orio collects cloud-tech stories at ISTE. CDW-G's VP, K12 Education Bob Kirby, and Director of Sales, K12, John Pellettiere led a round table discussion of Cloud-using administrators at ISTE. IlliniCloud is one of many success stories. IlliniCloud worked with CDW, a leading provider of technology solutions, to supply affordable access to virtual servers, online storage and high-speed network connectivity across the state of Illinois - technology that, until recently, was out of reach for most K-12 schools there. Sharing data center resources and costs among schools across the state helps each school district to focus more on advancing the use of technology in the classroom for the direct benefit of students.
Watch the Interview:

Extron iPad Controller App: ISTE

There's an App for that. Extron provides an easy way to control classroom multimedia by using an iPad. The new app was given The Royal Treatment at ISTE. Looks simple to use.

Watch my Extron booth visit:

Lightspeed Technologies Classroom Audio: ISTE

Find out about REDCAT and TOPCAT in this interview with Bruce Bebb. Lightspeed Technologies can create an audio environment for enhanced classroom learning. REDCAT is right out of the box, and TOPCAT is an easy-to-install ceiling solution. At ISTE Lightspeed was given The Royal Treatment.

Watch and learn how easy it is to create the best classroom audio for instruction:

Toshiba THRiVE: ISTE

Toshiba's THRiVE gets The Royal Treatment at ISTE. Kelcey Kinjo, product manager at Toshiba, hits on some of the THRiVE's features, including a user-replaceable battery—a big education-upkeep benefit. While the new back plates make a fashion statement, this new 10-inch screen tablet from Toshiba is making some education waves for those looking for classroom-tablet alternatives.

Watch my ISTE visit with Toshiba as the new THRiVE gets The Royal Treatment:

Qualcomm's Kristin Atkins: ISTE Interview

Qualcomm's Kristin Atkins, Director of Wireless Reach, talks about tablets, wireless initiatives, and the D.C. Wireless Conference during our interview at ISTE Philadelphia.

Watch the interview:

Pushing More Through Wires: Crestron

I was invited to an early morning Crestron press conference at InFoComm. I've spent more time waiting for technology to do its thing than most, so I'm always intrigued when someone shares how it can be done better, and more efficiently. Crestron engineers have figured out how to push more signal and data down the line than ever before. Technically, it's more efficient multiplexing.  

Watch and listen to how they do it:

QOMO's QPC60 Doc Cam: InFoComm

QOMO's QPC60 Document Camera gets The Royal Treatment at InFoComm. Shannon Raupp shares functions and features.

Watch my booth interview to learn what this versatile document camera can do:

ELMO at InFoComm: TT-12 Interactivity

I gave the new ELMO TT-12 document camera The Royal Treatment at InFoComm. This doc cam (visualiser) has more positions than a yoga instructor. It doesn't need a computer, and has its own audio and recording capabilities. It also can be seamlessly connected to ELMO's slate.

Watch the video interview and demo to see if the TT-12 is the right match for your interactive classroom, school, or district:

Luidia's VP Jody Forehand: InFoComm

Jody Forehand, Luidia's VP of Product Planning, gets The Royal Treatment during an interview at InFoComm. Learn about Luidia and eBeam, as well as their interactive role in the education marketplace. With Luidia, its about doing what they do well, and having great partners, including HP, Chief, Hitachi, and Claridge for support. Forehand talks about how to outfit new and old classrooms for education interactivity. Watch the Interview:

InFoComm Tech Pick: Laser Projection

Pro and Short Throw #10CF5532
I’ve been following bulbless projector technology from the start. I was one of those instructional tech specialists who taught kids and teachers, as well as climbed ladders to change projector bulbs and filters. I also had to allocate a lot of funds for replacements. While the bulbless/filterless idea isn’t new, Family Of Products2 the LASER/LED/hybrid light source technology is new and amazing. With this technology, we’re talking about 20,000 hours of eco-friendly, or short throw projection life without mercury lamps. Casio has embraced this technology in its DLP short-throw (top image) and slim-green (bottom image) projectors.

What’s cool about this new technology is that DLP (Texas Instruments) and 3LCD—two competitive and most-used technologies in education projection—and for that matter, projectors in general—can love this LASER/LED hybrid tech, too. That said, while an extremely cool addition, the technology will be developed further, I’m sure—it can only get better. Speculation is that laser projectors could go to 30,000 hours. You don't have to an engineer to Imagine the cost savings there.

If you’re spending a lot of money on replacement bulbs—even if you’re getting two for the price of one—and having your tech crew climb ladders to frequently replace them— you might be getting nearer to just monitoring all those newly-gained hours of projection life with my InFoComm Tech Pick—Laser/LED hybrid technology.

 “While we are extremely proud of the success around our SLIM line, we knew that we could continue to build on the technology, understanding that different industries face different challenges. Our new family of projectors is built with those needs in mind and will deliver tailored solutions to increase efficiency and streamline costs,” says Frank Romeo, vice president of Casio’s Business Projector Division.

Slim and Signature #10CF54E2

Samsung SUPERHERO: Pushing the Doc Cam Envelope

Austin_davinici
The Samsung’s Imaging Division
, which includes document cameras, regularly does these SUPERHERO video competitions, where students get to win a nice $500 cash prize, as well as a SAMCAM 860 document camera for their classroom. For the contest, students portray a historical character and are judged on presentation, performance, character and content accuracy, as well as quality.

Austin, a fifth grader from Blissfield, Michigan won the winter contest. He played the part of Leonardo da Vinci. The spring winner will be named on June 17, 2011. Entry information for these and future competitions can be found at www.samsungk-12.com.

Checking out contests and grants for classroom tech is fun, and you never know—you might win.

I like the idea of pushing the envelop with document cameras, whether it’s by teachers or students. Just using doc cams to display documents, today, is call for a faculty brainstorming session. It’s an easy to use, interactive classroom tool that deserves a place in any creative classroom.

Even the simplest document camera models, those without video options, have great still-image capabilities. For example, a simple changing of the slideshow display time to its quickest intervals, using still images in sequence, can create the appearance of animation with objects or clay. Sort of a new-age flip book.

Editor's Note:

I always recommend checking building and district rules to make sure you’re within the guidelines. Samsung’s SUPERHERO contest is safe as well as fun. Having students dress up in what amounts to a disguise should pass any AUP (Acceptable Use Policy). It’s a good idea for everyday classrooms, too. Kids love to dress up to play the part of a scientist or even a mathematician.

Tracking Cloud Trekking

CdwgK12a
CDW released the results of their Cloud Computing Tracking Poll. 1,200 IT professionals were surveyed to assess current and future cloud computing use.

According to the polll, 28% of U.S. business, government, healthcare and education organizations are using cloud computing, and that 73% reported the first step was single cloud application. Furthermore, 84% of those polled confirm that they have already employed at least one cloud application. This seems to be a testing of the waters, because most have not identified themselves as “Cloud Users”.

CDW defines cloud computing as a model for enabling convenient, on-demand access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications and services) that can be rapidly provisioned.  

David Cottingham, senior director, managed services at CDW says,  “With thoughtful planning, organizations can realize benefits that align directly with their organizational goals: consolidated IT infrastructure, reduced IT energy and capital costs, and ‘anywhere’ access to documents and applications.”    
 
The breakdown of cloud application usage was email 50%, file storage 39%, Web and video conferencing, 36 and 32 percent, respectively, and online learning 34 percent.

When asked about the estimated potential to operate in the cloud, the IT pros reported that only 42% of their current services would fit, but planned to spend 34% of their IT budget on cloud computing by 2016. They see that as saving over 30% of their IT budget by using cloud resources and applications. And even those respondents who were non-cloud users expect to spend 28% of their budget on cloud computing in the same time period.

The bottom line was that 84%  of current cloud users reported they cut application costs by moving to the cloud, and that the average savings on applications moved to the cloud was 21%.

“The potential to cut costs while maintaining or even enhancing computing capabilities for end users presents a compelling case for investment in cloud computing,” Cottingham said.  Furthermore, “The fact that even current cloud users anticipate spending just a third of their IT budget on cloud computing within five years suggests that before wide-scale implementation, IT managers are taking a hard look at their IT governance, architecture, security and other prerequisites for cloud computing, in order to ensure that their implementations are successful.”

More about the survey:

The CDW Cloud Computing Tracking Poll includes findings specific to each of the eight industries surveyed during March 2011:  small businesses, medium businesses, large businesses, the Federal government, state and local governments, healthcare, higher education and K-12 public schools.  The survey sample includes 150 individuals from each industry who identified themselves as familiar with their organization’s use of, or plans for, cloud computing.  The margin of error for the total sample is ±2.7 percent at a 95 percent confidence level. The margin of error for each industry sample is ±8.0 percent at a 95 percent confidence level.  

 
Get survey copies and learn more about cloud computing:

For a copy of the complete CDW 2011 Cloud Computing Tracking Poll, please visit http://www.cdw.com/cloudtrackingpoll. For more about CDW’s cloud computing capabilities and offerings, please visit http://www.cdw.com/cloud.

About CDW

CDW http://www.cdw.com/ is a leading provider of technology solutions for business, government, education and healthcare.

Tablet-Age Professional Development

3603
Curtis-Linton If Professional Development scheduling and planning isn’t working, Curtis Linton, Vice President of School Improvement Network may be able to help. Find out how to do professional development for today's digital staff. Linton will also share the award winning PD360 online solutions and resources, from School Improvement Network, for school districts.

 Listen to this Royal Treatment Episode—Tablet-Age Professional Development:

Listen here if you don't have Flash capabilities (iPad Users):

iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

MP3 Link: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/1/893/show_1893031.mp3

Embedded Player option:

Tech-Lite Educator Apps & Tech

Pad3 Ok, I broke down and bought an iPad 2. Yeah, like I was the only one! For me, the purpose went beyond watching movies, FaceTime, eBooks, or listening to music or audible literature. My main goal was to go light, and I know that educators may want to try it, too. Here’s how the iPad 2 with a couple of Apps, can take the computer off your desk, or the laptop off your lap—in a light sort of way—that is.

What you’ll need:

1. iPad or iPad 2 for $499: The 16 MB WiFi version is pretty much what most everyone needs.

2. Pages for $9.99: My heart is that of an educator, and I understand the importance of free, as well as inexpensive, but Pages is worth the cash. For me, it allows me to write, word process, and even e-mail my work/documents. There are some fancy-prepared templates, but I use the blank page to do my work. There are other options for iWork and iDisk, and even one for sending to iTunes. I don’t really get the iTunes option. So, I’m thinking that administrators and educators who like to travel light, and pack a bit of writing power would really find using Pages with an iPad extremely productive for more than class notes, meetings, workshops, notes to parents, and lesson plans. Oh, don’t forget sharing to that great education blog you’ve started. Pages is not perfect, but I think it is the best thing out there for the purposes I’ve mentioned. You might be traveling lighter, and leaving the laptop home.

3. Penultimate for $1.99: There are a lot of note taking possibilities. I’ve discovered the only gadget Pad1 that does both notes and audio is Livescribe, but we’re talking iPads and note taking here, so Penultimate is my choice. At first writing with your finger may seem a bit like finger painting, but using the pen, eraser, and undo tools is a snap on lines, graphs, or blank note pages. Changing the pen color and sizes is easy. I like that I can reorder, organize, or delete note pages quickly. I’m old fashioned, so you’ll still see me with a small traditional paper pad, but I’m really close to ditching that, too. If only I had more hands! Wonder if there’s an Ap for that?

4. Bluetooth Wireless Keyboard for $69. This may be optional for some, but not for me. Yep, I broke down and bought a super wireless keyboard for my clunky old hands. While I’m a thumb-typing star on my Blackberry, I’m all stumbling-fingers on the iPad’s touch keyboard. Without the Bluetooth keyboard, I’d never get beyond a first line. The keyboard is really for times when I’m not on the move, so I see it as more of a desktop device. I know my limitations. While roaming, my finger pointing technique is just fine, but if I need to write something like this post, for me, that’s a job for a real keyboard.

5. Optional: Stand of some sort for about $29.99 or less.  I got one called Loop at Target by Griffin. It’s simple and heavy enough. It works on a table, or pretty much wherever you can stand it. The iPad fits in beautifully vertically or horizontally.
Pad2

New Jersey School Boards Association Learn@Lunch

Nj3 I received a wonderful invitation from NJSBA (New Jersey School Boards Association) and Erik Endress to join them for a Learn@Lunch program today. Principal Eric Sheninger hosted the event at his amazing school today. You'll see the teacher in the administrator, enough energy to power a battleship, and they're making it happen in an older building. This was one of the tightest presentations I've seen involving social media, students, parents, and teachers. Beyond the presentation, there were some serious answers to some serious questions from attendees at New Milford High School and those visiting virtually. Fortunately, it was archived using Adobe Connect and you can see it here:

http://njsba.adobeconnect.com/p13932108/?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal

Es1 From Facebook to Bring Your Own Technology to cell phones to class projects, you'll watch and listen to some ideas that will spark and enlighten. The student sharing was brilliant. One student talks about her European visit for a humanities Holocaust project, and three others do great and useful product reviews of handhelds they use.

If you watch one presentation this year, this should be the one. Share it with your PLN, admin, and other educators.

Teq helped out with the interactive tech, which included a whiteboard.

Principals Connect

In the mid 90s, Gwen Solomon began directing her Well Connected Educators online. Her idea was to get Gwen_solomon educators to write and talk about what they were doing in their districts with technology. I was one of many, who joined in to share beyond the faculty room and classroom walls. A lot of educators, who were local pioneers in teaching with technology, and wanted to share, had a chance to do it because of Gwen Solomon.

Today, there’s a group of principals and other administrators doing the same thing online. Connected Principals http://www.connectedprincipals.com/ is all about principals sharing ideas—and as you’ll read, with the Internet and social media, there are no boundaries for sharing.

Question: Why do you connect on Connected Principals?

Larkin Patrick Larkin
Principal
Burlington High School in Massachusetts

Connected Principals has become one of my most valuable resources both in the content and with my connections with the contributors. I get a daily dose of best practices in leadership from innovative Principals. In addition, the connections we have made also allow me the ability to interact with these great leaders and gather insights help me in my school improvement efforts in my own school.  I never imagined that this collaborative blog would become such a vital resource for me.  There is no other magazine, newspaper, blog, etc. that I consider more significant than this blog!

Geo George Couros
School Principal
Forest Green School and Connections for Learning
Stony Plain, Alberta, Canada

Connected Principals was created as a way of having school administrators from around the world share best practices and learn from one another.  Through this transparency of our own learning and focus on doing what is best for kids, we also wanted to show that administrators were aligned with educators working in the classroom directly with students.  Connected Principals was created to not only share learning with administrators, but with all educators.   I personally have learned that I am never limited to the ideas of a school or even division; I now have access to ideas from any part of the world.  This wealth of knowledge from so many can really help improve learning for our students.

Meister Dave Meister
Director
Illinois' first Cooperative High School

Connected Principals has allowed me to be exposed to a diverse set of views on many different issues in education. If you are a committed life-long learner, connecting with other practicing professionals is a must. I think what makes CP unique is that we choose to exchange our thoughts and ideas here because we are bound by a passion for our profession, the use of social media to connect, and the need to make education work for our local learning communities. I have not found a dynamic learning opportunity that fits my needs as well anywhere else. The ideas expressed and the ensuing dialogue that accompanies them continually challenge my mindset and make me a better educator!

Truss David Truss
Principal
Dalian Maple Leaf Foreign Nationals School
Dalian, China

At first it was just to get to know some colleagues from all over the globe. My colleagues here in China have very different situations than me, and live in different cities, so I saw this as a great opportunity just to connect. Now, I find it indispensable for not just learning, but also guiding my practice. I’ve read many things here that I feel like I could have written, as it sits so well with my own philosophy and yet I’ve also read many things that I could not have written because I lack the wisdom and experience and even insight to come up with the ideas shared. I once read that technology doesn’t isolate us, it just extends our reach. My professional reach has been extended in a very powerful way with Connected Principals.

Smith Shannon Smith
Vice Principal
W. Erskine Johnston PS
Ottawa, Ontario

Connected Principals provides a forum in which we can share our ideas as we shape and refine our vision of education. The blogging community brings together a diverse collection of voices from educational leadership across the globe.  We don’t always agree on all points, but the conversation is that much richer for the diversity. There is a shared commitment to students and learning that draws us together. Reading my colleagues’ posts, I find my thinking being pushed in new directions, which gives me constant fuel for professional growth and learning. I have also appreciated the support that I have received from other CP bloggers. This support is what helps me stay focused on the big picture and how the local changes that I am working towards fit within it.  Finally, I like to be inspired, and the CP blog provides that on a regular basis. On many occasions it has provided me with reading recommendations, information on new approaches, and innovative ideas for addressing challenges at the local level.

Wejr Chris Wejr 
Principal
Kent Elementary School
Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada

Connected Principals is an opportunity to share some of the positive things that are happening at my school; too, it provides me with the opportunity to be challenged and encouraged by a larger audience of educators from around the globe. In addition, by subscribing to the feed for the blog, I gain further inspiration from passionate administrators whose ideas I borrow, adapt and modify to benefit the students of my school. The CP is more than a blog, it has been a door that has led me to enhanced relationships with a network of educational leaders whom I can turn to (through the blog, Twitter, email, Skype, Facebook, etc) for advice, encouragement, and critical reflection.  This collaborative tool is irreplaceable in my practice.

Martin Jonathan Martin
Principal

St. Gregory College Preparatory School
Tucson, AZ

I was already blogging regularly, on my own blog, but I began noticing as I became more active on Twitter that my solo blogging was a little bit lonely and a little bit sterile, lacking in exchange and discussion. On twitter I found increasingly exciting the opportunity to expand my PLN beyond its previous, far more narrow, parameters, but I wanted to do more to strengthen my new network and take the conversations deeper. Having always been a private school administrator and watching the broader, multi-national conversation about education reform, progress, and advancement happening from the sidelines, I felt the wish to raise my voice and have a forum in which I can do more to contribute to that larger conversation, and I immediately saw CP as an opportunity for that.  That is why I chose to connect in the first place, but over time I have been stunned by the extent to which my thinking and understanding of critical issues in education have grown by leaps and bounds by the posts, comments, and ongoing exchange that is happening at CP among both the writers and the readers of CP, which I believe has fast-become a very valuable hub for educators internationally who share, to some extent at least, the CP Guiding Principles.

(Editor’s Note: If you’re curious about what happened to Well Connected Educator, it morphed into something called TechLearning ;>))

Educators Review Tech

BIT TODAY(vertical, loRes) Glad you’re here, but you need to see Best in Tech Today—make it a daily stop, and share it with your staff and fellow educators. I know that sounds like meeting relatives at the door, and telling them to go next door for dinner. It’s just that the neighbors, in this case, are serving up something unique—educators reviewing education technology and solutions.

Best in Tech Today is a place where the “go to” people in a school/district share, which makes Best in Tech Today the “go to” place for ideas that work, and ideas that can be replicated.

Gathering a group of local experts in one place leaves open the possibility for live forums and interactive discussions, too. As an educator/administrator, you need to hear from people who are actually using edtech solutions, and many times in spectacular ways.

Let’s put it this way, if you asked a student what he/she learned in class today, you wouldn’t settle for an “It was good… it was fun… it was engaging…” answer. By bookmarking http://blogs.scholastic.com/bestintechtoday/ you’ll get daily, specific how to reviews from education and education tech experts.

Education Clouds Cleared: Berj Akian Interview

Berj In this episode of The Royal Treatment—Taking Learning to the Clouds—Berj Akian, Founder and CEO of ClassLink, helps define, more clearly, the meaning of Cloud Computing in education, and in today’s classrooms. Akian will also share the ClassLink solutions, including ClassLink LaunchPad.
Listen as Berj Akian clears up Cloud Computing:

MP3 Podcast Link: http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/1/743/show_1743511.mp3

ITunes Link: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-royal-treatment-blog-talk/id414014159

Embedded Player (requires Flash):

Karen McMillan: Conferences Help Educators Connect ASCD

In my interview with teacher Karen McMillan at ASCD 2011, she recommends that educators attend conferences to meet like-minded professionals, share ideas, and hear cutting-edge teaching how tos. The world may seem social-media smaller, but educators still need to connect with the bigger world—out there. Teaching benefits, and therefore student learning will, too. Interestingly, McMillan has picked up on what the experts are saying about the best of social media, in that when you have good learning networks, the people in them are well known before meeting them in person. And, if you are lucky enough to meet your PLN members in-person, you are one step up on the professional relationship, as well as solidifying the friendship. "It seems you know them already."
Watch Karen McMillan discuss the importance of PLNs with me at ASCD 2011:

Eee Pad Transformers to the Rescue!

Eeepad I have a very dear friend working at Asus corporate in Taiwan. She always keeps me in the loop on what’s new at Asus, and almost always makes me smile for remembering me. Today, I received a press release on the new Eee Pad Transformer, along with a link to a very recognizable sitcom spoof, in which the Eee Pad Transformer plays a starring role. I’ve embedded it at the bottom of this post. It should make you smile, and really give you a short look at the unique Eee Pad design.

The Eee Pad seems to be more than a tablet, or a convertible notebook. You can actually detach and separate the PC keyboard side from the Tablet side quickly and easily. Together or separate, I like the creative way Asus is looking for a step up on Apple’s tablet dominance. The 16GB model is slated for under $700 (US). When you consider that the 16GB iPad is going for $499, having the Eee Pad Transformer options makes a lot of dollar sense.

The Asus Eee Pad runs Android’s 3.0 Honeycomb, and shouldn’t be confused with their e-Slate, which runs Windows. Asus’s 10.1-inch Transformer offers unlimited Web storage, either 9+ or 16-hour battery life, depending upon choice, and front and rear cameras. I like that it has Gorilla glass, as well as its 10-finger touch capabilities. Multi-tasking is a no brainer on these, but happily it is not the only iPad differentiation factor. It’s nice to begin seeing companies, like Asus, move from Apple-chasing to creatively leading the pack again.

Enjoy watching this Eee Pad sitcom spoof; spotting the guest star should be easy:

Intel Convertible Classmate Makes Book Bag Obsolete

Intel's Convertible Classmate PC makes a good case for an all in one 1:1 computing device for today's students. Check out my review of the Convertible Classmate to see if it's right for your needs. Could the book bag be obsolete?
View the review:

Thunderbolt: Crazy-Fast Intel I/O!

What’s an I/O, and what’s Thunderbolt?

Thunderbolt Simply, an I/O means input and output. So, what’s that have to do with Thunderbolt? Well, Intel’s 10 Gbps (Gigabits per second) wonder—for input and output transfer—will allow crazy-fast transfer of data. For instance, a full-length HD movie in 30 seconds. That’s 20 times faster than USB 2.0, and 12 times faster than the latest Firewire. And it’s bi-directional—input and output!—through just one port!

So, if you’re a person that transfers a lot of video, images, or audio, a device that has Thunderbolt is for you. And, most of us are in that ballpark these days—everyone is doing  a lot of video, audio, images, and media. Now, while most of us would be satisfied with a new computer without it, and probably not know the difference, having one with it, might be worth waiting for—if you can. Right now, Apple’s MacBook Pro has it. While there may not be many peripheral devices to hook up with it yet, having a computer with Thunderbolt now, will have you ready when that does happen.

Believe me, I try to avoid being geeky at The Royal Treatment, but sometimes tech information needs to skirt the geek a bit. And I wouldn’t be here now—if my going-on-six-year-old, black beauty, 13-inch MacBook hadn’t begun to show its age, by continually beach-balling applications, and just plain quiting on me. I love that machine, and, it has as many air miles on it as I do. Time and tide….

My initial thought was to put my old 13-inch out to pasture—sort of—and buy a new one just like it—white this time. I know everyone is going after those new iPad 2s, but I do a lot of video and audio these days, so an iPad 2 wouldn’t cut it, and now that I know about Thunderbolt, I’ve begun to look at MacBook Pros, for a few more bucks. While I use Window’s machines as well for what I do, Mac with Thunderbolt makes sense for me. It may not be for you, but Thunderbolt on a Window’s Product may be.

Exceptional Needs Education: Autism & Disabilities

This episode of the Royal Treatment—Exceptional Needs Education: Autism and Disabilities shares how two different organizations have made it their business to help students with autism, students with disabilities, as well as their families. In this professional development talk, we’ll hear philosophy, and also specifics of what help, technology, and software is actually available for children and their parents today. Joining us are Lauren Stafford, who was Academic Supervisor for Instructional Design, and is now the Visual Learning Solutions Vice President at the Monarch School for students with Autism in Ohio, and Chris Vacek, Chief Innovation Officer at the HeartSpring School for children with disabilities in Wichita, Kansas. This Royal Treatment is truly a professional development for all teachers, as well as special education professionals.
Listen to Exceptional Needs Education: Autism & Disabilities:

iPad 2 Made for Teaching

No one from Apple talks with me, and I hate that we jump through their hoops—for them—every six months. That said, there is good reason for educators to look at the new iPad 2 for leading and teaching a class—at any age level. I’m not going to get into any of the technical spec, but it’s sufficient to say that version 2 is a different machine. Let me specifically say, though, that I’m talking about this tool in the hands of a teacher. I know that there will be many posting on the benefits of iPads in the hands of students, and I look forward to those—as well as first hand journals and reporting, but this is more about why I’m buying one for my daughter, a 3rd grade teacher.

Mirroring Lessons

DongleMirroring isn’t new, but the iPad 2 makes it possible for a teacher to present and control a class lesson. Using a $39 dongle (connector) a teacher can mirror, or show, what he/she has on the iPad desktop, and have it appear directly on a larger display screen. (HDMI, oh my!) I know, you can do that with a netbook or laptop, but as my daughter said, “I can hold the iPad 2 in one hand and work it easily with the other hand; it will be a lot easier than juggling my laptop.” She can do computer stuff and direct her class, too.

My daughter uses a lot of photos with her students, as well as a document camera and projector to enhance instruction. With the iPad2 and dongle connection it will be easier to share those images, bring in lesson-specific and appropriate video, and Web pages, too. The iPad 2’s AV adaptor makes it a lightweight and quick classroom teaching device, but it is also the easiest to use user interface going—today. My daughter is a wonderful teacher without technology, and she isn’t a tech fanatic like her dad, so it needs to work easily, and seamlessly. If she can plug it in, works with a touch, kids get more involved in the lesson, and it improves her teaching—it makes sense.

My wife, who, and I’m not afraid of saying this aloud—because she’ll agree—which doesn’t happen often—has no tech sense, ability, or interest at all in anything tech—wants one. She just learned to text this year—thanks to my daughter. It was a miracle!

My wife claims texting is easy. She has a Windows laptop, but avoids it—for her, it’s not easy to use—she also calls it names—but I won’t go into that. Too much has to be done in order to get from point “A” to point “B”, and it’s easy to get lost in-between.

Apple sucked my wife in with an iPad commercial—afterward she said, “I can do that!” And, I have to agree—she can. I actually told her that our 2-year old grandson could use one. That gained me no points with her—but did earn me one of those familiar one-raised-eyebrow looks.

I know that others will point out more elaborate iPad 2 teaching possibilities, and that Windows slate, notebook, and netbook providers will be sharing the fact—that they can do all of this, too—but for teachers like my daughter—this looks like a best bet—for now. Oh, yeah, a side perk—I’ll get to see my grandsons—thanks to those two cameras—by using using Skype, or FaceTime on a soon-to-be-smudged 10-inch screen—although I’ll have to look over my wife’s shoulder to do it—and that will be the most difficult thing of all!

Ed Tech Innovation: Kyle Berger Interview

Kyle In this episode of the Royal Treatment—Ed Tech Innovation —Kyle Berger, Executive Director of Technology Services for the Alvarado ISD, Texas, shares lessons on how technology leaders can think more outside the box to make things happen. Berger discusses his community outreach Internet kiosks, operating a successful, two-year, 2,000-student 1:1 program, creating district partnerships for disaster recovery, the bring your own device concept and its part in the future of 1:1 programs, and more. Listen to ideas from a true education future-thinker and entrepreneur. It may be the best professional development lesson you hear this year. (Note: All Royal Treatment shows are archived, and transcripts available for purchase.)
Listen to Ed Tech Innovation:

EdTech Over the Pond

In this episode of The Royal Treatment—EdTech Over the Pond—Steven Anderson, District Instructional Technologist for the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, USA, meets the UKs Joe Dale, an independent consultant working with CILT, Links into Languages, The British Council, The BBC, and host of the TES MFL Forum. Together they share EdTech possibilities to try, as well as Web 2.0 ideas that can be modified, or translated to work for educators and students in classrooms—whichever side of the pond you find yourself.
Listen to the Discussion:

Education UnConferences

Education UnConferences shares what an UnConference is, as well as what one can do for a district. Hear about a specific UnConference for new teachers called ntcamp. Guests are Principal Patrick Larkin, Burlington High School, Burlington, Mass, Principal Eric Sheninger, New Milford High School, NJ, and Professor Andrew Marcinek Montgomery Co. Community College Instructional Technology Specialist. Listen to the discussion:

SMART Audio Gets Heard: The Royal Treatment

SMART Audio gets The Royal Treatment. Steven Yao is interviewed by Ken Royal. Sound systems are becoming standard equipment for ALL students in classrooms. It gives all students an equal opportunity to hear everything a teacher says.
Watch the Interview:

StrataLogica: World at Teaching Fingertips-Royal Treatment

StrataLogica (Herff Jones) has a new kind of map that gets The Royal Treatment. Ken Royal interviews Don Rescigno. Seeing and interacting with globes was so 20th Century! Here's reality at your teaching fingertips. Watch the Interview, and see the interactive geography show:

RM Slate Gets Royal Treatment

RM Education's RM Slate gets The Royal Treatment at FETC. Ken Royal talks to RM's Christy Smith.
Watch the interview:


KINEO Gets Royal Treatment

The KINEO Slate at FETC. Jeff Cameron talks to Ken Royal for The Royal Treatment. Watch the interview:

 

Advertisement

Advertisement

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in The Royal Treatment are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.