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Write!

Clipart_office_papers_029   I love to write. I write lists, letters, articles, lessons, blog entries and more. I encouraged my first graders to write - even if they just wrote what sounds they heard. I told them, "As long as you know what it says, it is writing." Sometimes they just wrote random letters and then asked me what they wrote. I told them that they needed to know what they were writing. That's part of communicating. The important thing is that they write to express their ideas. I firmly believe that writing helps children learn to read. And reading helps children learn to write. So I encourage kids to write in their journal or blog every day.

So still thinking technology in the classroom, let's concentrate on blogging. Previously I added a link to Blog in Plain English. So hopefully you watched it and understand what a blog is. Here are some other ideas on how to use blogs and blogging rules for your classroom. I love this video called "Why Let Our Students Blog" by Rachel Boyd from New Zealand. Click the arrow to watch it and be sure to let us know what you think.

If you are looking for blogs to read or to show for examples, check out the Scholastic Blogs or Blog CarnivalTyploop

Looking for a place to create and manage classroom blogs? Check out Edublogs or Blogger . Or if you have a Mac OS X Server, wikis and blogs are created and managed within your own district. Teachers can use Classroom Homepage Builder to post updates for their students and parents.

What is your favorite blog? How do you use blogs in your classroom? What do you use to create or manage your classroom blogs? We'd love to hear from you.

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Comments are closed. Please see Classroom Solutions, our new blog for the 2009-2010 school year. And stay tuned for Teaching Matters with Angela Bunyi and Beth Newingham.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in Tech Tutors "Supporting Teachers Use of Technology" are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.