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Table Time

Who says that tablets need to be small enough to throw into a backpack? Not Lenovo or Panasonic. The two companies made a big splash at CES by reengineering the tablet for table use with a pair of innovative devices that stretch the current definitions of what a slate is and can be. The only question is how big do you want to go.

HORIZON_4)To start, the Lenovo IdeaCentre Horizon 27 all-in-one PC is the big boy of the two. With a 27-inch touch screen, it is adaptable and customizable like no other computer because it can be used upright on a desk or folded flat onto a tabletop. There’s also an optional wheeled stand that allows it to be tilted or set up horizontally for a group to work around. The Horizon 27 uses Windows 8 as well as Lenovo’s Aura interface and has its own battery that’s rated to power the machine for two hours on a charge. That way, it can be wheeled to where it’s need, regardless of whether there’s a power outlet nearby. Pricing starts at $1,700.

Panasonic-20-inch-4k-tablet-cesPanasonic’s 20-inch tablet is smaller, lighter and pushes the envelope when it comes to screen resolution. Capable of showing 3,840 by 2,560 resolution images, the Panasonic monster tablet sets the pace for tablets, small and large. Based on a 1.8GHz Intel Core i5 processor, Nvidia graphics, 128GB of flash storage and Windows 8, the tablet weighs 5.3-pounds, but is only 0.4-inchhes thick and has a built-in battery that can power it for two hours. No word on pricing or availability, though.

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