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Cable-Free Connections

Wireless 5G aIt’s ironic and at times frustrating, but the cost of installing video cabling to project a teacher’s notebook can often dwarf the price of the AV equipment involved. No more, with Kinivo’s WHD 110 Wireless 5G HD AV Kit. At $139, it is a bargain compared to what an electrician can cost to do it with wires.

Based on the Wireless Home Digital Interface protocol, the kit can move more than enough AV data over thin air to support an HD audio and video stream. The box includes a transmitter (to plug into the notebook) and a receiver (to plug into the projector or large screen monitor). Together, they can bring the output of a notebook, DVD player, cable box or just about anything with an HDMI connector to the whole class.

Unlike using Google’s Chromcast, the good news is that there’s no software to install, making the 5G kit perfect for technophobic instructors and young students. In fact, the 5GHz transmitter-receiver duo replaces a physical HDMI cable by streaming audio and video between the boxes.

Other than opening the box, pulling out the devices, attaching their stands and plugging the two boxes in, there’s nothing to do. All told, it takes about 2 minutes to set it all up.

Wireless 5G dBoth the sender and receiver have HDMI ports and LEDs to show they’re connected. The receiver adds an IR window for use with the included remote control and comes with an IR Blaster extension that lets you put a remote control sensor within 6-feet of the box

Unfortunately, both the transmitter and receiver require their own power and the kit includes an AC adapter for each. But, the Wireless 5G set only comes with one HDMI cable; you’ll need two to use it.

Once it’s all set up, the system can move full video and sound from computer to screen. It works with 3-D material at full high definition resolution, but the kit only works with HDMI sources and destinations, ignoring VGA and DisplayPort equipment.

I used the Wireless 5G kit with several notebooks and tablets, including an Acer Aspire R7 and a Dell Venue Pro 8, on the sending side and an Epson BrightLink Pro 1410Wi projector and Sceptre 32-inch display on the receiving side. It was able to move everything from Web-based video to classroom software. It really came into its own with interactive material, like the University of Colorado’s PHET science and math simulations and a touch-screen tablet, which can inexpensively replace most of the elements of a more expensive interactive white board.

The system connected in a couple of seconds and had a useful range of about 42-feet, which should be plenty for the typical classroom or small auditorium. While the receiver can move between different sources and the transmitter automatically re-establishes a connection when it’s back in range, the devices work better when both are vertically oriented.

Its video output is only as good as the source material it has to work with, but at 12-feet, the video was crystal clear with good color, audio synchronization and an almost imperceptible delay. On the other hand, the transmitter and receiver tend to get hot while in use, hitting a peak of 124 degrees Fahrenheit.

Wireless 5G cWhile its size and weight restrict the Wireless 5G kit to stationary use, it outdoes Google’s Chromecast by working with anything that has an HDMI port, although for some newer computers a micro-HDMI converter will come in handy. Unlike Intel’s WiDi, it works with just about any source that has an HDMI port. Still, Kinivo’s Wireless 5G HD AV Kit is an inexpensive way to share video with the class without cables.

 A-

Wireless 5G b

Kinivo Wireless 5G HD AV Kit

$139 

+ Replaces HDMI cable

+ Less expensive than physical wiring

+ Video and audio

+ No software needed

+ Full HD resolution

+ Includes IR Blaster

 

- Transmitter and receiver require power

- No VGA or DisplayPort connectors

- Gets hot

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