About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Inspiring Choice

Inspiron11_3000Who says that notebooks must have an upright screen, keyboard and can only be used on the lap or a desk. Not Dell, because the company’s Inspiron 11 3000 is like a Transformer toy that can change among several different configurations depending on what needs to be done.

The company calls it a 2-in-1, but that’s a modest understatement. In fact, I found that the Inspiron 11 can assume at least five different computing personalities appropriate for schools, plus, I suspect, a few more that I haven’t thought of. Rather than having a removable keyboard base, the magic of the system’s multiple personalities is its sturdy pair of hinges that allows the display to rotate nearly 360-degrees.

While the system can sit on a table or lap like a true notebook, it has a touch-screen that can be rotated, allowing it to be used flat on a tabletop, making it perfect for finger painting or drawing a map. Rotate it farther and the system turns into a tablet; the keyboard, which is underneath is automatically turned off. The screen and keyboard base can also be formed into a “V” shaped tent for group work or with the keyboard pointing down and bringing the screen up so that it can be used for collaboration, presentations or viewing videos.

Going between the configurations is easy and takes little effort. On the downside, the screen wobbles a bit too much when it’s in notebook mode and you swipe or tap it.

At 3.1-pounds and measuring 11.8- by 7.9-inches, it is the right size for a variety of classroom uses from the teacher showing a group about vowels to students using it in a physics lab. The system is only 0.8-inches thick, which leaves more room in the backpack at the end of the day. By contrast, Dell’s similar XPS 11 is a few tenths of an inch thinner and lighter, but is more expensive and its keyboard isn’t as comfortable to type on.

Inspiron11_3000_6With its AC adapter, the system has a travel weight of 3.6-pounds. This makes it great for going from room to room all day in a bag. Fortunately, there’s a large touchpad and keyboard that has dedicated keys for adjusting the system’s brightness, volume and playing videos. The 18.6-millimeter keys aren’t backlit for projector-based lessons but it’s much better than the screen-based keypads on tablets for typing anything longer than a Web site address.

Its 11.6-inch screen shows 1,366 by 768 resolution, which should be just fine at school, but pales in comparison to full HD displays. It can interpret up to ten independent touch inputs, but sometimes didn’t respond on the first try.

The $480 version that I looked at is priced right in the range that schools can afford. It features a quad-core Pentium N3530 processor that runs at 2.2GHz as well as 4GB of RAM and a 500GB hard drive. Dell also has an entry-level $400 model that is built around a Celeron processor.

While it can connect via its 802.11n WiFi system, the Inspiron 11 3000 gets by without a wired LAN port and a Trusted Platform Module for secure remote access. The system has Bluetooth and a good assortment of connection possibilities including one USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports. The Inspiron 11 3000 can run a projector with its HDMI connection, but lacks an old-school VGA port. There’s also a headphone jack and an SD card slot; happily, the card doesn’t stick out.

Inspiron11_3000_7In addition to a recessed power button, the system has a volume control that is handy regardless of what form the system is taking at the moment. It has an LED that shows its battery status, but not one for system activity.

Above the display is a 720p Web cam that has a microphone on either side. The system has Waves MaxxAudio Pro software that lets you customize the system’s sound. It has a pair of speakers.

For such an inexpensive system, it was a surprisingly good performer. Based on its PerformanceTest 8 score of 716.5, it won’t set any records but can handle just about anything that a student, teacher or administrator can throw at it. Even with a bright screen that delivered 292 candelas per square meter of illumination, its 3,600 milli-amp hour battery was able to power the machine for 6 hours and 40 minutes of continuously playing videos over WiFi. That’s more than two hours longer than Dell’s XPS 11 and more than enough for a full day of school work with something left over at 3PM. The Inspiron 11 3000, however, requires a three-prong outlet to charge up, which might pose a problem in an older building.

All in all, the Dell Inspiron 11 3000 brings together everything needed to make it a success in the classroom and does so at a price that districts can afford.

A

Inspiron11_3000_2

Dell Inspiron 11 3000

$479

+ Price

+ Five computing personalities

+ Right size for variety of tasks

+ Performance

+ Battery life

 

- Screen wobbles

- Neither VGA nor LAN port

 

Comments

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e54faaf86b883301a511f5ae07970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Inspiring Choice:

Permalink

Permalink URL for this entry:
http://blogs.scholastic.com/techtools/2014/08/inspiring-choice.html

Comments
Post Comment

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign In

Advertisement

Advertisement

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in Tech Tools are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.