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Count by Legos

45210_350x350_1_xx-xxIf your school’s early educational math manipulative items are worn out or starting to look dated, Lego has a tactile way to teach basic math. The MoreToMath 1-2 Curriculum pack is aimed at first and second graders and includes 521 Lego bricks that kids play with while larning their numbers and basic skills. The set comes with software, a book of 48 activities with images, assembly instructions and a sample Q&A section for interacting with students. There are interactive-whiteboard based lessons and a nice checklist for the teacher to record student progress.

45210_350x350_3_xx-xxThe set’s activities typically take between 30 and 45 minutes and involve creating scenes of baking, counting flowers and shopping that make the abstract concepts of counting, basic math operations and problem solving come alive. None, however, bring in calculators. While its early learner focus is commendable, there should be a version for the increasing Kindergarten and pre-K classes that schools are offering, maybe using the larger Duplo pieces. The $830 Lego set includes enough pieces for twelve groups of two. It can be pre-ordered for delivery in early 2015.

Math For the Real World

WINlogo2Forget about the intricacies of advanced algebra and calculus because WIN Learning’s WIN Math concentrates on the math a student will need in life and the workplace. Aimed at 5th through 8th graders who are a year behind on math, WIN Math has interactive tools, problems and connections to real-world jobs that use math. It’s divided up into 36 units that cover 16 career-based topics.

By the Numbers

MAP_v2.0KnowRe’s math curriculum starts with an assessment of the student’s base knowledge and skills and uses that information to create a personalized learning program. With education disguised as games, interactive elements and graphics, KnowRe tests as it teaches by continually assessing student progress. The whole program is cloud-based, can run on just about any recent computer and teachers and administrators can look in on how individual students or an entire class is doing with a detailed dashboard screen.

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